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Theodule Bushway (Bourgeois) or (Bushwa) (View posts)
Posted: 18 Sep 1999 7:29AM GMT
Looking for parents of John Bushua/Bushway or Theodule Bourgeois born 1810 Canada. Married March 1846 South Hero, Vermont to Florence Parot (Perrotte). [This was her second marriage her maiden name was Eustach b. Canada 1820.] I am searching for the area of Canada- as well as, any other information.

Bushway/Parot

Posted: 4 Jul 2000 5:42PM GMT
Edited: 20 Feb 2002 9:02PM GMT
My great grandmother was a Parot from Grand Isle Vermont. Her name was Celia she had a twin named Delia their fathers name was Joseph, this was a rather large family and i was lead to believe the they were all relatedThey also spelt their name Parrotte, Parrott, Parrot. I am still researching this side or my family tree and I am planning a day trip to the islands this week.

Re: Need Information

Posted: 14 Nov 2004 2:28PM GMT
Classification: Query
Ancestors of Theodule Bourgeois


Generation No. 1

1. Theodule Bourgeois, born September 08, 1805 in St-Antione-de Verchéres, Richelieu, Québec, Canada1; died in Grand Isle County, Vermont. He was the son of 2. David Bourgeois and 3. Marie Magdeleine Cormier. He married (1) Marie Florence Eustach Perrotte2 March 19, 1846 in Justice of the Peace in South Hero, Vermont3. She was born January 10, 1818 in St-Philippe-de-LaPrairie, LaPrairie, Québec, Canada4,5, and died June 13, 1878 in Grand Isle, Grand Isle County, Vermont6. She was the daughter of Jacques Perot and Josephte Caille dit Biscornet.

Notes for Theodule Bourgeois:
Baptism:
Parish records, St Antione sur Richelieu, 1805
translated by Roger Lawrence

Baptized the eighth of September 1805 by me priest pastor was teodule Bourgeois legitimate son of David Bourgeois and Marie Cormier farmers. The godfather was Pierre Landry and the godmother was Amable Cheval who declared not being able to sign at this request according to the ordinance.

P.J. Compaign
priest & pastor

More About Theodule Bourgeois:
Aka (Facts Pg): John Bushway
Baptism: September 08, 1805, St-Antoine-de-Verchéres, Richelieu, Québec, Canada7
Godfather: Pierre Landry7
Godmother: Amable Cheval8
Godparent to: Pierre Landry and Amable Cheval

Notes for Marie Florence Eustach Perrotte:
Godparent to:
between 1860 and 1863 Julien Perrot St-Rose-de-Lima, South Hero, Grand Isle County, Vermont
31 December 1865, Florence Chagnon at St-Rose-de-Lima, South Hero,Grand Isle County, Vermont

More About Marie Florence Eustach Perrotte:
Baptism: 1818, St-Philippe-de-LaPrairie9
Godfather: Jean Baptiste Gatien10
Godmother: Marie Josephte Gareau11

Generation No. 2

2. David Bourgeois, born 1754 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died in St-Antoine-de-Chambly, Richelieu, Québec, Canada. He was the son of 4. Michel Bourgeois and 5. Marguerite Richard. He married 3. Marie Magdeleine Cormier January 15, 1780 in St-Antoine-de-Chambly, Richelieu, Québec, Canada.
3. Marie Magdeleine Cormier, born October 01, 1762 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died in St-Antoine-de-Chambly, Richelieu, Québec, Canada. She was the daughter of 6. Jean Cormier and 7. Marie Magdeleine Bernard.

More About David Bourgeois:
Burial: January 26, 1808, St-Antoine-de-Chambly, Richelieu, Québec, Canada

Children of David Bourgeois and Marie Cormier are:
i. Marie Madeleine Bourgeois, born March 11, 1782 in St-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canada; married Charles Engers June 17, 1799 in St-Antoine-de-Chambly, Richelieu, Québec, Canada.
ii. David Bourgeois, born November 26, 1783 in St-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canada.
iii. Joseph Jean Bourgeois, born March 11, 1786 in St-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canada.
iv. Michel Bourgeois, born June 08, 1788 in St-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canada; died July 14, 1788 in St-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canada.
v. Marie Desanges Bourgeois, born July 08, 1789 in St-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canada; died September 28, 1793 in St-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canada.
vi. Marie Charlotte Bourgeois, born July 19, 1793 in St-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canada.
vii. Marie Florence Bourgeois, born July 22, 1796 in St-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canada.
viii. Isaac Bourgeois (Twin), born April 15, 1799 in St-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canada.
ix. Marie Archange Bourgeois (Twin), born April 15, 1799 in St-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canada.
x. Sophie Desanges Bourgeois, born Abt. 1803; married Francois Xavier Paquet ditLavallee 1823 in St-Marc-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canada.
1 xi. Theodule Bourgeois, born September 08, 1805 in St-Antione-de Verchéres, Richelieu, Québec, Canada; died in Grand Isle County, Vermont; married Marie Florence Eustach Perrotte March 19, 1846 in Justice of the Peace in South Hero, Vermont.


Generation No. 3

4. Michel Bourgeois, born August 15, 1722 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada. He was the son of 8. Charles Bourgeois and 9. Madeleine Cormier. He married 5. Marguerite Richard Abt. 1748 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
5. Marguerite Richard, born 1725 in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada. She was the daughter of 10. Martin Richard dit Sansousy and 11. Marie Marguerite Cormier.

Children of Michel Bourgeois and Marguerite Richard are:
i. Marie Bourgeois, born 1752 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Pierre Guertin January 23, 1775 in St-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canada.
2 ii. David Bourgeois, born 1754 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died in St-Antoine-de-Chambly, Richelieu, Québec, Canada; married (1) Marie Magdeleine Cormier January 15, 1780 in St-Antoine-de-Chambly, Richelieu, Québec, Canada; married (2) Francoise Gaudet November 17, 1818 in St-Antoine-de-Chambly, Richelieu, Québec, Canada.
iii. Felix Bourgeois, born 1756 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Marie Gaiasson January 13, 1775 in St-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canada.
iv. Michel (1) Bourgeois, born 1757 in St-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canada; died Bef. 1767 in St-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canada.
v. Jean Baptiste Bourgeois, born 1762 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vi. Gertrude Bourgeois, born 1763 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Pierre Cotard September 26, 1785 in St-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canada.
vii. Marie Marthe Bourgeois, born 1765 in St-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canada.
viii. Michel (2) Bourgeois, born 1767 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
ix. Joseph Bourgeois, born 1768 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married (1) Marie Louise Girouard January 16, 1792 in St-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canada; married (2) Marie Desanges Gauvin August 15, 1814 in St-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canada.


6. Jean Cormier, born 1728 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died June 30, 1792 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada. He was the son of 12. Pierre Cormier dit Rossignol and 13. Marie Anne Cyr. He married 7. Marie Magdeleine Bernard Abt. 1760.
7. Marie Magdeleine Bernard, born 1735 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. January 1761 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada. She was the daughter of 14. Jean Baptiste Bernard and 15. Cecile Gaudet.

Children of Jean Cormier and Marie Bernard are:
3 i. Marie Magdeleine Cormier, born October 01, 1762 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died in St-Antoine-de-Chambly, Richelieu, Québec, Canada; married (1) David Bourgeois January 15, 1780 in St-Antoine-de-Chambly, Richelieu, Québec, Canada; married (2) Francois Gaudet November 17, 1818 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
ii. Marie Rose Cormier, born March 17, 1761 in St-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canada.
iii. Firmin Cormier, born Abt. 1765 in St-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canada; married Catherine Phaneuf July 30, 1787 in St-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canada.
iv. Felix Cormier, born Abt. 1770 in St-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canada; married Genevieve Couretmanche January 31, 1791 in St-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canada.


Generation No. 4

8. Charles Bourgeois, born 1695 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada. He was the son of 16. Charles Bourgeois and 17. Marie Anne Blanchard. He married 9. Madeleine Cormier February 16, 1718 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
9. Madeleine Cormier, born 1700 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died July 10, 1741 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada. She was the daughter of 18. Alexis Francois Cormier and 19. Marie Leblanc.

Children of Charles Bourgeois and Madeleine Cormier are:
i. Charles Bourgeois, born 1719 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married (1) Anne Poirier February 02, 1742 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married (2) Marie Josephte Pitre 1752 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
ii. André Bourgeois, born 1720 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died in Louisiana.

More About André Bourgeois:
Residence: 1777, East bank of the Mississippi in St. James Parish, LA

4 iii. Michel Bourgeois, born August 15, 1722 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Marguerite Richard Abt. 1748 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
iv. Pierre Bourgeois, born 1723 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married (1) Marie Richard February 14, 1745 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born in B; married (2) Marie Bernard February 08, 1763 in St-Antoine-de-Chambly, Richelieu, Québec, Canada; born 1724 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
v. Catherine Bourgeois, born 1732 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vi. Claude Bourgeois, born 1734 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Marie Vigneau January 09, 1764 in St-Pierre, Miquelon, Québec, Canada.
vii. Jean Baptiste Bourgeois, born 1737 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Marie Elisabeth Prince February 17, 1762 in Becancour, Québec, Canada.
viii. Anne Bourgeois, born Bef. 1740; married Joseph Gaudet 1756 in In exile.


10. Martin Richard dit Sansousy, born 1692 in Beaubassin, Cumberland, Nova Scotia, Canada; died 1735 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada. He was the son of 20. Martin Richard and 21. Marguerite Bourg. He married 11. Marie Marguerite Cormier 1712 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
11. Marie Marguerite Cormier, born Abt. 1698 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died February 14, 1745 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada. She was the daughter of 22. Francois Cormier and 23. Marguerite Marie Leblanc.

Children of Martin Sansousy and Marie Cormier are:
i. Joseph Richard, born 1712 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died February 02, 1770 in Becancour, Nicolet, Québec, Canada; married Francoise Cormier January 29, 1742 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.

More About Joseph Richard:
Residence: 1760, Family established at Becancour

ii. Marie Richard, born 1714.
iii. Martin Richard, born 1715 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Marguerite Cormier 1740 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
iv. Pierre Richard, born 1716 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Anne Gaudet 1740 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
v. Jean Baptiste Richard, born 1719 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died 1744 in Louisiana; married Catherine Cormier Abt. 1740 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; born 1721 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died August 1778 in Cabahannocer, Lousiana.
5 vi. Marguerite Richard, born 1725 in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Michel Bourgeois Abt. 1748 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
vii. Jean Richard, born 1728 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died 1775 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married (1) Madeleine Bernard 1750 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married (2) Marie Josette Hamel 1762 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.


12. Pierre Cormier dit Rossignol, born 1695 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1744 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada. He was the son of 22. Francois Cormier and 23. Marguerite Marie Leblanc. He married 13. Marie Anne Cyr Abt. 1718 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
13. Marie Anne Cyr, born 1700 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1744 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada. She was the daughter of 26. Jean Baptiste Cyr and 27. Francoise Melanson.

Children of Pierre Rossignol and Marie Cyr are:
i. Madeleine Cormier, born 1719 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1752; married Étienne Mignault 1752 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
ii. Marie Cormier, born 1720 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1757 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Charles Gaudet 1738 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
iii. Pierre Cormier, born 1722 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
iv. Jean Francois Cormier, born 1726 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1746 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Marie Josephte Cyr May 22, 1747 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
v. Anne dit Nanette Cormier, born 1727 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died Bef. 1750; married Pierre Bourg February 21, 1745 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
6 vi. Jean Cormier, born 1728 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died June 30, 1792 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Marie Magdeleine Bernard Abt. 1760.
vii. Francoise Cormier, born 1732 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
viii. Francois Cormier, born 1735 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1759 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married (1) Marie Jeanne Victoire Leprince January 07, 1760 in Becancour, Québec, Canada; married (2) Louise Genevieve Richard February 08, 1796 in Becancour, Québec, Canada.
ix. Marguerite Cormier, born 1737 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1754 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Jacques dit Canique Bourg 1754 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
x. Rosalie Cormier, born 1740 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
xi. Pierre Cormier, born 1742 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1770 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married (1) Madeleine Leprince April 08, 1771 in Becancour, Québec, Canada; married (2) Angélique Vigneau April 12, 1795 in Becancour, Québec, Canada.
xii. Marie Blanche Cormier, born 1745 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.


14. Jean Baptiste Bernard, born 1696 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada. He was the son of 28. Rene Bernard and 29. Madeleine Doucet. He married 15. Cecile Gaudet November 28, 1719 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
15. Cecile Gaudet, born 1704 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada. She was the daughter of 30. Claude Gaudet and 31. Marguerite Belou.

Children of Jean Bernard and Cecile Gaudet are:
i. Marie Bernard, born 1724 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Pierre Bourgeois February 08, 1763 in St-Antoine-de-Chambly, Richelieu, Québec, Canada; born 1723 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
ii. Paul Bernard, born 1728 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
iii. Pierre Bernard, born 1731 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married (1) Marguerite Arseneau 1752 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married (2) Cecile Bergeron June 13, 1770 in St-Jacques, Louisiana.
iv. Marie Madeleine Bernard, born Abt. 1733 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
v. Michel Bernard, born 1734 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Marie Anne Guilbeau January 25, 1761 in Martinville, Louisiana.
7 vi. Marie Magdeleine Bernard, born 1735 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. January 1761 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Jean Cormier Abt. 1760.
vii. Jean Bernard, born 1736 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
viii. Jacques Bernard, born 1738 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
ix. Francois Bernard, born 1740 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
x. Joseph Bernard, born 1742 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
xi. Rosalie Bernard, born 1744 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
xii. Osithe Bernard, born 1747 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.


Generation No. 5

16. Charles Bourgeois, born 1672 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died 1722 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada. He was the son of 32. Charles Bourgeois and 33. Anne Dugas. He married 17. Marie Anne Blanchard 1691 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
17. Marie Anne Blanchard, born 1674 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died August 18, 1772 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada. She was the daughter of 34. Guillaume Blanchard and 35. Hugette Gougeon.

Children of Charles Bourgeois and Marie Blanchard are:
8 i. Charles Bourgeois, born 1695 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married (1) Madeleine Cormier February 16, 1718 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married (2) Louise Bourg June 10, 1742 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
ii. Jeanne Bourgeois, born 1692 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Michel Poirier February 16, 1717 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
iii. Marie Bourgeois, born 1696 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Jean Jacques Muriat 1712 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
iv. Pierre Bourgeois, born 1699 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Marie Cormier August 18, 1722 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
v. Honoré Bourgeois, born 1702 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Marie Jeanne Richard July 23, 1726 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Acadia, Canada.
vi. Michel Bourgeois, born 1704 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Marguerite Girouard 1728 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
vii. Jean Baptiste Bourgeois, born 1706 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Anne Bernard February 03, 1733 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
viii. Jacques Bourgeois, born 1708 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Marie Bourg February 03, 1733 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
ix. Madeleine Bourgeois, born 1712 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Michel Cyr 1729 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
x. Marie Anne Bourgeois, born 1713 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Jean Cyr February 03, 1733 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.


18. Alexis Francois Cormier, born 1672 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1712 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada. He was the son of 36. Thomas Charles Cormier and 37. Marie Madeleine Girouard. He married 19. Marie Leblanc 1697 in Grand Pre, Kings County, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
19. Marie Leblanc, born 1678 in Grand Pre, Kings County, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died 1732 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, cumberland, acadia, Canada. She was the daughter of 38. Jacques Leblanc and 39. Catherine Hébert.

Children of Alexis Cormier and Marie Leblanc are:
i. Marie Cormier, born 1698 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
9 ii. Madeleine Cormier, born 1700 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died July 10, 1741 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Charles Bourgeois February 16, 1718 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
iii. Pierre Cormier, born 1703 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died 1761 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Marguerite Cyr November 22, 1718 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1707 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died December 24, 1757 in Miquelon, Nova Scotia, Québec, Canada.
iv. Agnes Cormier, born 1705 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1744 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Pierre Paul Cyr 1724 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1702 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1744 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
v. Marguerite Marie Cormier, born 1706 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died 1752 in Malpeque, Prince edward Island, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Pierre Arceneaux Abt. 1731 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vi. Jean Baptiste Cormier, born 1710 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died Bef. 1745; married Marie Theriault 1734 in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vii. Francois Cormier, born 1709 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1741 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Anne Cyr 1730 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1709 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died November 30, 1774 in Miquelon, Nova Scotia, Québec, Canada.
viii. Anne Cormier, born 1712 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.


20. Martin Richard, born 1665 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; died Abt. 1748 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada. He was the son of 40. Michel Richard dit Sansoucy and 41. Madeleine Blanchard. He married 21. Marguerite Bourg.
21. Marguerite Bourg, born 1668 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; died in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada. She was the daughter of 42. Francois Bourg and 43. Marguerite Madeleine Boudrot.

Children of Martin Richard and Marguerite Bourg are:
10 i. Martin Richard dit Sansousy, born 1692 in Beaubassin, Cumberland, Nova Scotia, Canada; died 1735 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Marie Marguerite Cormier 1712 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
ii. Alexandre Richard, born 1695 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died in Acadia, Canada; married Marie Madeleine Thibodeaux 1723 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.

More About Alexandre Richard:
Residence: 1741, Tthey were on Ile St Jean.

iii. Michel Richard, born 1697 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Marie Marthe Doucet 1730 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
iv. Marie Anne Richard, born 1699 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Pierre Doucet Abt. 1716 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
v. Marie Richard, born 1700 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Jean Quiessi February 06, 1748 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
vi. Marguerite Richard, born 1702 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Claude Arsenault Abt. 1719 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
vii. Joseph Richard, born 1705 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Marie Josephe Comeau 1732 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
viii. Madeleine Richard, born 1708 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
ix. Pierre Richard, born 1711 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Madeleine Doucet August 11, 1733 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
x. Paul Richard, born 1716 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died 1721 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
xi. Francoise Richard, born 1716 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died 1776 in Acadia, Canada.


22. Francois Cormier, born 1670 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Abt. 1732 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada. He was the son of 36. Thomas Charles Cormier and 37. Marie Madeleine Girouard. He married 23. Marguerite Marie Leblanc 1697 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
23. Marguerite Marie Leblanc, born 1675 in St-Charles-des-Mines, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1712 in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada. She was the daughter of 38. Jacques Leblanc and 39. Catherine Hébert.

Children of Francois Cormier and Marguerite Leblanc are:
i. Marie Cormier, born 1694 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1727 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Martin Richard 1712 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
12 ii. Pierre Cormier dit Rossignol, born 1695 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1744 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Marie Anne Cyr Abt. 1718 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
iii. Anne Cormier, born 1696 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Jacques Poirier January 21, 1715 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
11 iv. Marie Marguerite Cormier, born Abt. 1698 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died February 14, 1745 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Martin Richard dit Sansousy 1712 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
v. Catherine Marie Cormier, born 1700 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died Bef. 1732 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Francois Bourg November 18, 1721 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; born 1670 in Port Royal, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vi. Cecile Cormier, born 1703 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1740; married Pierre Bourg 1722 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
vii. Paul Cormier, born 1706 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, acadia, Canada.
viii. Marie Anne Cormier, born 1708 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died February 12, 1742 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Joseph Bourg October 24, 1713 in Beau, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
ix. Francois Cormier, born 1710 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died March 31, 1741 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, acadia, Canada; married Anne Cyr 1730 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia,Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
x. Joseph Cormier, born 1712 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1747 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married (1) Francoise Cyr November 24, 1733 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; born 1713 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1741 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married (2) Marie Arsenault 1739 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
xi. Jean Cormier, born 1718 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, acadia, Canada; married Madeleine Hebert November 25, 1740 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
xii. Marie Josephte Cormier, born August 02, 1722 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, acadia, Canada; married Louis Joseph Cyr 1739 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.


26. Jean Baptiste Cyr, born 1671 in Port Royal Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; died Aft. 1713 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada. He was the son of 52. Pierre Cyr and 53. Marie Bourgeois (The Elder). He married 27. Francoise Melanson 1698 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
27. Francoise Melanson, born 1672 in Port Royal Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; died Aft. 1713 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada. She was the daughter of 54. Charles Laramee dit Melanson and 55. Marie Dugas.

Children of Jean Cyr and Francoise Melanson are:
13 i. Marie Anne Cyr, born 1700 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1744 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Pierre Cormier dit Rossignol Abt. 1718 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
ii. Michel Cyr, born 1705 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
iii. Marguerite Cyr, born 1707 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died December 24, 1757 in Miquelon, Nova Scotia, Québec, Canada; married Pierre Cormier November 22, 1718 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1703 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died 1761 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
iv. Anne Cyr, born 1709 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died November 30, 1774 in Miquelon, Nova Scotia, Québec, Canada; married (1) Francois Cormier 1730 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1709 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1741 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married (2) Francois Arsenault February 07, 1745 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
v. Jean Cyr, born 1711 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1767 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Anne Marguerite Cormier January 26, 1733 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vi. Jean Baptiste Cyr, born 1714 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died April 30, 1759 in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Marie Luce Caissy 1737 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vii. Francoise Cyr, born 1713 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1741 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Joseph Cormier November 24, 1733 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; born 1712 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1747 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
viii. Pierre Paul Cyr, born 1702 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1744 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married (1) Agnes Cormier 1724 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married (2) Agnes Cormier 1724 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1705 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1744 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.


28. Rene Bernard, born 1663 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada. He married 29. Madeleine Doucet Abt. 1689 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
29. Madeleine Doucet, born 1670 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.

Children of Rene Bernard and Madeleine Doucet are:
14 i. Jean Baptiste Bernard, born 1696 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Cecile Gaudet November 28, 1719 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
ii. Rene Bernard, born 1690 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Anne Belou July 11, 1713 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
iii. Joseph Bernard, born 1692 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married (1) Marie Gaudet 1720 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married (2) Marie Gaudet 1720 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1703 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
iv. Marie Bernard, born 1693 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Guillaume Girouard 1713 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
v. Marguerite Bernard, born 1701 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Francois Arceneau January 10, 1718 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vi. Anne Bernard, born 1703 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Joseph Poirier October 02, 1719 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vii. Michel Bernard, born 1705 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.


30. Claude Gaudet, born 1677 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada. He was the son of 60. Pierre dit L'Aine Gaudet and 61. Anne Blanchard. He married 31. Marguerite Belou 1700 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
31. Marguerite Belou, born 1680 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.

Children of Claude Gaudet and Marguerite Belou are:
15 i. Cecile Gaudet, born 1704 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Jean Baptiste Bernard November 28, 1719 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
ii. Pierre Gaudet, born 1702 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
iii. Marie Gaudet, born 1703 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Joseph Bernard 1720 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1692 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
iv. Marguerite Gaudet, born 1706 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
v. Marie Josephte Gaudet, born 1708 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Ambroise Poirier 1732 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vi. Madeleine Gaudet, born Abt. 1710 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Pierre Hébert 1723 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vii. Claude Gaudet, born 1712 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
viii. Charles Gaudet, born 1716 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
ix. Agnes Gaudet, born 1718 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
x. Agathe Gaudet, born Abt. 1720 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.


Generation No. 6

32. Charles Bourgeois, born 1647 in Port Royal, Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; died 1678 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada. He was the son of 64. Jacques Jacob Bourgeois and 65. Jeanne Trahan. He married 33. Anne Dugas 1670 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
33. Anne Dugas, born 1654 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died November 04, 1740 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada. She was the daughter of 66. Abraham Dugas and 67. Marguerite Louise Doucet.

Notes for Charles Bourgeois:
Census 1671 Acadia
Charles Bourgeois 25
Anne duGast 17
2 arpents, 12 cattle, 7 sheep
Enfans : Marie 1



Notes for Anne Dugas:

Acadian Church Records 1679-1757
translated by Winston DeVille, 1964
Beaubassin, April 26, 1679, Marriage
Jean Aubin Meignaux, of the parish of Beauport near Québec, Canada, son of Jean Baptiste Meignaux and Louise Cloutier
Anne Dugast, of the parish of St.Jean Baptiste of Port Royal, widow of Charles Bourgeois, habitant of
Beaubassin, daughter of Abraham Dugast and Marguerite Doucet
Witnesses : Mr. de la Valliere, seigneur of Beabassin and commandant for the king in acadia; Mr.
Abraham Dugast, father of the widow; Claude Dugast, the widow's brother

Census 1686 Chignitou dit-Beaubassin
Anne Dugas 34
Jean Aubin Mignault 36
2 guns, 8 arpents, 20 cattle, 4 sheep, 24 hogs
Enfans Charles Bourgeois : Charles 14, Claude 12, Anne 7
Enfans Mignault : Jean 6, Cecile 2-1/2, Alexis 3 months

Children of Charles Bourgeois and Anne Dugas are:
i. Marie Bourgeois, born 1669 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died Bef. 1678 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
16 ii. Charles Bourgeois, born 1672 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died 1722 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Marie Anne Blanchard 1691 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
iii. Claude Bourgeois, born 1674 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Anne Blanchard 1701 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; born 1684 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada.
iv. Anne Bourgeois, born 1678 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Jean Caissy dit Roger 1695 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Acadia, Canada.


34. Guillaume Blanchard, born 1650 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died 1716 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada. He was the son of 68. Jean Blanchard and 69. Radegonde Lambert. He married 35. Hugette Gougeon Abt. 1695 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
35. Hugette Gougeon, born 1657 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; died December 18, 1717 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada. She was the daughter of 70. Antoine Gougeon and 71. Jeanne Chabrat.

Children of Guillaume Blanchard and Hugette Gougeon are:
17 i. Marie Anne Blanchard, born 1674 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died August 18, 1772 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Charles Bourgeois 1691 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
ii. Rene Blanchard, born 1678 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; married Marie Savoie January 18, 1708 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
iii. Guillaume Blanchard, born 1679; married Jeanne Dupuis January 16, 1714 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
iv. Antoine Blanchard, born 1680 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; married Elisabeth Theriault January 31, 1701 in Port.
v. Jeanne Blanchard, born 1681; married Oliver Daigle Abt. 1694 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vi. Madeleine Blanchard, born 1682; married Charles Gauterot Abt. 1700 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vii. Jean Blanchard, born 1687 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada.
viii. Elisabeth Blanchard, born 1689; married Claude Girouard Abt. 1707 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
ix. Gilles Blanchard, born 1690 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada.
x. Pierre Blanchard, born 1695 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; married Anne Robichaud November 07, 1718 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
xi. Charles Blanchard, born 1698 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; married Marie Girouard January 03, 1718 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
xii. Anne Blanchard, born 1684 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; married Claude Bourgeois 1701 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; born 1674 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.


36. Thomas Charles Cormier, born 1636 in LaRochelle, Charente Maritime, Aunis, France; died 1690 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada. He was the son of 72. Robert Cormier and 73. Marie Perade. He married 37. Marie Madeleine Girouard 1688 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
37. Marie Madeleine Girouard, born 1654 in Port Royal Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; died 1707 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.

Notes for Thomas Charles Cormier:
The ancestor of the Cormier family in Acadia - Thomas - was born around 1636 in La Rochelle, France. He was the son of master carpenter Robert Cormier and of Marie Piraude. He came to Acadia as a child with his father to work on Nicolas Deny's fort at Saint Peters on Cape Breton.

The enlistment contract, signed at La Rochelle on January 8, 1644 was found in the archives of notary Teuleron. Robert Cormier agreed to come to Acadia with his family and to work there for three years. It appears that Robert returned to France and that his only son, Thomas, stayed in Acadia. About 1668, Thomas Cormier, about 32 years old, married Marie-Madeleine Girouard, daughter of François Girouard and Jeanne Aucoin. Once established at Port-Royal, Thomas and Marie-Madeleine were among the first colonists/settlers at Beaubassin, where their son Pierre was born March 25, 1682. Pierre married Catherine LeBlanc about 1702, the daughter of Jacques LeBlanc and Catherine Hébert. The eldest of their children was named after his father. Pierre married Cécile Thibodeau, daughter of Jean and Marguerite Hébert on July 17, 1730 at Grand-Pré. This last couple are the ancestors of all of the Cormier families of southeastern New Brunswick. The census taken in 1671 in Port-Royal indicates that Thomas Cormier was - like his father - a carpenter by trade, that he was 35 years old and married to 17-year-old Madeleine Girouard. He had a small farm with seven horned animals and seven sheep. A few years later, Thomas moved, with his family to Beaubassin, where he was one of the pioneers of the new Acadian colony. All Cormiers have their roots in Beaubassin. Thomas left a family of 10 children, including four sons: François, Alexis, Germain and Pierre. Their familes endured the miseries and deprivations brought about by the 1755 deportations. Because of their proximity to the present-day border of New Brunswick; many of the Cormiers were able to escape their persecutors by fleeing to the northern part of the province and Québec, where they found a safe haven and where numerous descendants of that family settled, particularly in the Trois-Rivières, Richelieu and the Gaspé areas. Certain Cormier families were deported to South Carolina and eventually made their way to Louisiana. Others found refuge on Miquelon and rejoined the land of their ancestors in France. In New Brunswick, the Cormier family pioneered the establishment of several Acadian communities such as Caraquet, Petit-Rocher, Memramcook and Bouctouche.

The ancestor of the Memramcook Cormiers, Pierre, married to Anne Gaudet, was captured by the British in 1755 and imprisoned in Fort Cumberland (Beauséjour). Tradition has it that Pierre escaped disguised as a woman. On the eve of the day when he and other Acadians were slated to be deported to Georgia, his sister brought him food as well as female garments. Pierre Cormier and his family lived on the St. John River in 1770, but he decided to leave in 1786 after the arrival of the Loyalists. He settled at Memramcook, where he died.








Children of Thomas Cormier and Marie Girouard are:
i. Madeleine Cormier, born 1669 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1705 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Michel Boudrot 1690 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born Abt. 1658 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; died 1708 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
22 ii. Francois Cormier, born 1670 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Abt. 1732 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Marguerite Marie Leblanc 1697 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
18 iii. Alexis Francois Cormier, born 1672 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1712 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Marie Leblanc 1697 in Grand Pre, Kings County, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
iv. Germain Cormier, born 1676 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1725; married Marie Leblanc 1704 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
v. Pierre Cormier, born March 25, 1682 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died 1730 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Catherine Leblanc 1702 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1683 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died November 1740 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.
vi. Claire Cormier, born 1684 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1722 in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Pierre Cyr 1700 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1678 in Port Royal Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; died Aft. 1722 in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vii. Marie Cormier, born 1686 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1732 in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Jean Baptiste Poirier 1708 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
viii. Jeanne Cormier, born 1688.
ix. Agnes Cormier, born 1686 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Pierre Poirier 1705 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.


38. Jacques Leblanc, born Abt. 1651 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. May 1731 in St-Charles-des-Mines, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada. He was the son of 76. Daniel Leblanc and 77. Francoise Gaudet. He married 39. Catherine Hébert 1673 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
39. Catherine Hébert, born 1656 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1692 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada. She was the daughter of 78. Antoine Hébert and 79. Genevieve Lefrance.

Notes for Jacques Leblanc:
After the 1686 census, Jacques settled his family in Riviere-aux-Vieux-Habitants in the Bassin des Mines. In 1730, when the British demanded that the Acadians swear an oath of allegiance to the British crown, Jacques and his sons were among those families which signed the document. This was the last document which mentions Jacques Le Blanc and it is assumed he died shortly thereafter.


Children of Jacques Leblanc and Catherine Hébert are:
i. Jean Leblanc, born 1674 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died June 10, 1747 in St-Charles-des-Mines, St-Charles-des-Mines, Grand Pre, Kings County, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada, Acadia, Canada; married Marguerite Richard 1698 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1677 in Port Royal, Nova scotia, Acadia, Canada.

More About Jean Leblanc:
Burial: June 11, 1747, Grand-Pre, nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada

23 ii. Marguerite Marie Leblanc, born 1675 in St-Charles-des-Mines, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1712 in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Francois Cormier 1697 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
iii. Jacques Leblanc, born 1677 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1718 in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Elisabeth Boudrot 1707 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1696 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
19 iv. Marie Leblanc, born 1678 in Grand Pre, Kings County, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died 1732 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, cumberland, acadia, Canada; married Alexis Francois Cormier 1697 in Grand Pre, Kings County, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
v. Antoine Leblanc, born 1680 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vi. Anne Leblanc, born 1681 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died January 30, 1770 in L'Assomption, Québec, Canada; married Pierre Breau 1705 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vii. Catherine Leblanc, born 1683 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died November 1740 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Pierre Cormier 1702 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born March 25, 1682 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died 1730 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
viii. Pierre Leblanc, born 1684 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died March 25, 1745 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Marie Landry November 15, 1718 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.

More About Pierre Leblanc:
Burial: May 25, 1745, Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada

ix. Marie Cecile Leblanc (Twin), born December 1686 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died May 25, 1731 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Michel Boudrot 1708 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.

More About Marie Cecile Leblanc (Twin):
Burial: May 26, 1731, Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada

x. Rene Leblanc (Twin), born December 1686 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1729 in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Jeanne Landry 1708 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1685 in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
xi. Madeleine Leblanc, born 1687 in St-Charles-des-Mines, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1737 in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Michel Hache-Gallant October 12, 1711 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
xii. Francois Leblanc, born 1688 in Riviere-aux-Vieux-Habitants, Acadia, Canada; died 1761 in Needham, Massachusetts; married Marguerite Boudrot September 19, 1712 in St-Charles-des-Mines, Nova Scotia, Québec, Canada.

Notes for Francois Leblanc:
From the research of Peter White:

During the great deportation of 1755, Francois, Marguerite and their family were deported to Point Shirley Massachusetts. Francois petitioned the Governour of the Massachusetts Bay Colonie to be removed from Point Shirley and move to Needham Massachusetts.

To his Excellency the Governour, the Hon'ble the Council and Representatives of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay. Francois Le Blanc a poor french Inhabitant of Accaday humbly shew That he and his family five of which are men were placed at Port Shirley that they have with great, difficulty supported themselves since the provision allowed by the Province ceased but now they cannot find work and theyhave a winter before them and no prospect of any opportunity of labour during that season
and all necessaries of life are excessive dear, there and your Petitioner's family must perish with hunger and cold. Your Petitioner has relations placed in the town of York and is known to Col. Donnell and Capt.Donnell and has traded with them, and he thinks he could support his family, tho he is 63 years old with the help of his sons and some little relief from the Publick and as there is but 8 French in that Town he hoped there will be no exception and humbly prays he may be placed there with his family.
FRANCOIS LEBLANC
CHARLES LEBLANC

Francois died in Needham Massachusetts in 1761.
Marguerite with four sons and a daughter, Simon and Marguerite being still in her household, were repatriated onto Miquelon Island near Newfoundland in 1763. In 1767 they removed to Memramcook New Brunswick with the families of her sons Charles and Francois.

xiii. Bernard Leblanc, born 1690 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Bef. 1764 in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Marie Bourg February 07, 1713 in St-Charles-des-Mines, Nova Scotia, Québec, Canada.
xiv. Ignace Leblanc, born 1692 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
xv. Bernard Leblanc, born 1693 in Grand Pre, Kings County, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1736 in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Marie Boueg February 07, 1713 in Saint Charles des Mines, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.


40. Michel Richard dit Sansoucy, born 1630 in Saintonge, France; died 1687 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada. He married 41. Madeleine Blanchard Abt. 1680 in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
41. Madeleine Blanchard, born 1643 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada. She was the daughter of 68. Jean Blanchard and 69. Radegonde Lambert.

Notes for Michel Richard dit Sansoucy:
Michel Richard was born in 1630 at Saintonge, near the western coast of France near LaRochelle. Michel arrived in Acadia with the expedition of Emmanuel le Borgne and Guilbeaux in 1652. He was a soldier in the garrison of Port Royal. There are only few
pioneers who transplanted the name Richard to the valley of Saint Laurent. Some carried it directly from France, while others came indirectly from Acadia, after having been deported by the British.

The first to come to Acadie with this name was Michel Richard who was dit Sansoucy, even though his life wouldn't be so "carefree" after all; ( "sans souci" is phonetically the same as Sansoucy, which literally means without care or worry, or care free ).

It should be noted tha tyou will often see the preposition "about" when dates are used for
our Acadian ancestors. This is because most of the registersfrom Acadie were reduced to ashes from the torches of the British, and which were remade thanks to the memories of parents, friends and missionaries.

Michel would have arrived before the capture of Port-Royal by Robert Sedgewick, Littoral Commander of New England. He probably participated in the defense of the place. The
region would have to be ruled for the next 16 years under the grip of the Bostoniens. exchanged his sword for an axe when he had obtained two concessions of land in Belleisle, a few miles up the Port Royal River from Port Royal, since no doubt the beauty of the place captured his heart, and shortly thereafter a young girl of twelve years of age would do the same. Michel married Madeleine Blanchard and they would become one of the ancient families of Acadie.

The British restored Acadie to France in 1670. Under British occupation, Michel didn't just fold his arms and do nothing. He cleared fourteen acres of land and owned fifteen heads of cattle and four sheep, and his family consisted of ten children; Rene, Pierre, Catherine, Martin, Alexandre, a pair of twins - Anne and Madeleine, Marie Josephte, Cecile and Madeleine.

When Michel was widowed, he married in 1683, Jeanne Babin, a young girl of fifteen years who was the daughter of Antoine and Marie Mercier. Jeanne was the sister of Charles Babin, the husband of Michel's daughter Madeleine. As such Michel became the brother-in-law of his daughter. Michel and Jeanne had two more children to add to the fold.

The 1755 Deportation dispersed his descendants thoughout North America and there are Richards everywhere on the continent, from Louisiana to the Maritimes. Michel died in 1687 at the age of 57. Some of his children went to several different parts of Louisiana.

Children of Michel Sansoucy and Madeleine Blanchard are:
20 i. Martin Richard, born 1665 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; died Abt. 1748 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Marguerite Bourg.
ii. René Richard dit Beaupre, born 1657 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Bef. 1692 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Madeleine Landry Abt. 1680 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
iii. Pierre Richard, born 1661 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Marguerite Landry Abt. 1686 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
iv. Catherine Richard, born 1663 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married François Broussard Abt. 1678 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
v. Alexandre Richard, born 1668 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Isabelle (Élisabeth) Petitpas Abt. 1690 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vi. Anne Richard (Twin), born October 1671 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died May 09, 1745 in Grand Pre, Kings County, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Germain Theriault Abt. 1686 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vii. Madeleine Richard (Twin), born October 1671 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Charles Babin Abt. 1685 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
viii. Marie Josephte Richard, born 1674 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died October 02, 1709 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Michel Vincent 1689 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
ix. Cecile Richard, born 1675 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Pierre Forest Abt. 1692 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
x. Marguerite Richard, born 1677 in Port Royal, Nova scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Jean Leblanc 1698 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1674 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died June 10, 1747 in St-Charles-des-Mines, St-Charles-des-Mines, Grand Pre, Kings County, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada, Acadia, Canada.

More About Jean Leblanc:
Burial: June 11, 1747, Grand-Pre, nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada


42. Francois Bourg, born 1644 in Richmond, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died 1685 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada. He was the son of 84. Antoine Bourg and 85. Antoinette Landry. He married 43. Marguerite Madeleine Boudrot 1665 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
43. Marguerite Madeleine Boudrot, born 1648 in St-Jean Baptiste, Port Royal, Acadia, Canada; died November 07, 1718 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada. She was the daughter of 86. Michel Boudrot and 87. Michelle Aucoin.

Children of Francois Bourg and Marguerite Boudrot are:
21 i. Marguerite Bourg, born 1668 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; died in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Martin Richard.
ii. Marie-Anne Bourg, born 1669 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; married Pierre Thibodeau 1690 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
iii. Alexandre Bourg dit Bellehumeur, born 1671 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; died 1760; married Marguerite Melanson 1694 in Grand Pre, Kings County, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
iv. Madeleine Bourg, born 1677 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; married Pierre Leblanc Abt. 1698 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
v. Pierre Bourg, born 1683 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada.
vi. Michel Bourg, born 1665 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; married (1) Isabelle Elisabeth Melanson 1689 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1673 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married (2) Elizabeth Mellanson 1689 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.


52. Pierre Cyr, born 1644 in Pouilly-en-Auxois, France; died June 1680 in Port Royal Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada. He married 53. Marie Bourgeois (The Elder) 1670 in St-Jean, Port Royal, Annapoliis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
53. Marie Bourgeois (The Elder), born 1652 in Port Royal Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; died March 02, 1740 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada. She was the daughter of 64. Jacques Jacob Bourgeois and 65. Jeanne Trahan.

Children of Pierre Cyr and Marie Elder) are:
26 i. Jean Baptiste Cyr, born 1671 in Port Royal Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; died Aft. 1713 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Francoise Melanson 1698 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
ii. Pierre Cyr, born 1678 in Port Royal Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; died Aft. 1722 in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Claire Cormier 1700 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1684 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1722 in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
iii. Guillaume Cyr, born 1680 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died 1744 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Marguerite Bourg 1708 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.


54. Charles Laramee dit Melanson, born 1643 in Yorkshire, England; died 1700 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada. He was the son of 108. Pierre Laverdure and 109. Priscilla Mellanson. He married 55. Marie Dugas 1663 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
55. Marie Dugas, born 1648 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; died July 07, 1737 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada. She was the daughter of 66. Abraham Dugas and 67. Marguerite Louise Doucet.

Notes for Charles Laramee dit Melanson:
A Brief History of This Acadian Family

The Melansons in Acadia:
Many a writer has tried to explain the origins of this family. It was generally believed that the Melanson were of Scottish origin, but this assumption was based on a historic mistake. There is no document that demonstrates that the Melansons who came to Acadia were of Scottish decent, in fact to the contrary there is proof that they were of English decent.

The two Melanson brothers, PIERRE, dit Laverdure, a stonemason, born in 1632, the spouse of Marie Marguerite Muis d'Entremont, the daughter of the Lord of Pomcoup, Philippe Mius d 'Entremont, and CHARLES, born in 1643, the husband of Marie Dugas, daughter of Armourer Abraham Dugas and Marguerite Doucet of Port Royal, arrived in Port Royal accompanied their parents aboard the ship the Satisfaction, with Sir Thomas Temple, the new English Governor of Acadia, which arrived in 1657. During almost a century, just until the deportation of the Acadians in 1755, the settlement was the place of residence of Charles Melanson and his wife Marie Dugas, and their descendents and associates.

"The Melanson Settlement" is one of the principle Canadian archeological sites illustrating the way of rural life in Acadia in the 17th and 18th centuries. It is a mirror of the various aspects "of the daily life, their homes, material culture and their prosperity. 1755: DEPORTATION: In the Autumn of 1755, 1660 Acadians of the region of Port Royal embarked on the ships towards exile. Charles and Ambroise Melanson took refuge in Quebec, while Jean Melanson and his family were refugies in France with a group of Acadians Cape Sable. Others were deported to Maryland and other States. The Melanson like hundreds of other Acadians were imprisoned in the military fortresses which were neither more or less than concentration camps. At gun point, English soldiers forced them to work for them. The Melansons were imprisoned at Forts Cumberland and Edward.

Today, this large Acadian family the name of [MELANSON] MELANSON-MELANCON-MALANSON-MALONSON can be found in all of Canada, the United States and in France. These Acadians all descendents of PIERRE and CHARLES MELANSON arrived in Acadia during 3 ½ centuries. The majority of Charles' descendents returned to the former Acadia, resettling in Nova Scotia and Southern New Brunswick, and in the USA in the States of Maine and Massachusetts, most continuing to spell their name Melanson, but some have changed to Malanson and Malonson. The majority of Pierre's descendents however did not return, resettling in Louisiana, Quebec, and Northern New Brunswick, in the Bathurst region. It is this branch of the family that today predominately spells their name MELANCON. The only descendent of Pierre known to have returned to Nova Scotia was Charles Marie who settled in Pomquet after returning with his mother from exile in France.

"There could soon be a new national site in this already history-rich area, (Annapolis Royal) "says Parks Canada officials. Property rights to Melanson Settlement, near Annapolis Royal and overlooking the Annapolis River are being transferred to the federal government, said Mart Johanson, Parks Canada's field unit supervisor for Mainland Nova Scotia. Melanson Settlement contains the remains of a pre-deportation Acadian village. Acadians, most belonging to the Melanson family, lived in the village from 1664 until they were deported in 1755, say heritage officials. The Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada recently recommended the site be recognized for its historic significance. The future of the site will be outlined in a Parks Canada management plan. Public meetings will be held in the region soon, Mr. Johanson said. (From the Halifax Chronicle-Herald)



Children of Charles Melanson and Marie Dugas are:
i. Marie Melanson, born 1664 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; married David Basset 1682 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada.
ii. Marguerite Melanson, born 1666 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; died 1754 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada.
iii. Anne Marie Melanson, born 1668 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; died May 14, 1754 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; married (1) Jacques St-Etienne dr La Tour 1684 in St. Jean Baptist Church, Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Canada; born 1661 in Pobomcoup, Cape Sable, Nova Scotia, Canada; died November 18, 1703 in Cape Sable, Shelbourne, Nova Scotia, Canada; married (2) Alexandre Robichaud Aft. 1704 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; born 1675 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; died March 25, 1742 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada.
iv. Cecile Melanson, born 1670 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1720 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; married Abraham Boudrot 1684 in Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1660 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; died 1698 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada.
27 v. Francoise Melanson, born 1672 in Port Royal Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; died Aft. 1713 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Jean Baptiste Cyr 1698 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vi. Isabelle Elisabeth Melanson, born 1673 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Michel Bourg 1689 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1665 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada.
vii. Charles Melanson, born 1675 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died September 19, 1757 in Québec City, Québec, Canadfa; married Anne Bourque 1701 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
viii. Marie Madeleine Melanson, born 1679 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died 1751 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Charles Belliveau dit Le Jeune 1699 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
ix. Ambroise Melanson, born 1685 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died 1756 in Queebec City, Québec, Canafda; married Marguerite D'Entremont November 10, 1705 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
x. Pierre Melanson, born 1685 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died August 06, 1725 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Anne Granger November 07, 1712 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
xi. Claude Melanson, born 1688 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died June 30, 1737 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Marguerite Babineau January 22, 1712 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
xii. Jean Melanson, born 1690 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died 1760 in Cherbourg, Manche, France; married Madeleine St-Seine dit Petitot January 22, 1714 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
xiii. Marguerite Madeleine Melanson, born 1693 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died July 15, 1744 in Grand Pre, Kings County, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Jean Baptiste Landry January 22, 1712 in Grand Pre, Kings County, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.


60. Pierre dit L'Aine Gaudet, born 1650 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada. He was the son of 120. Denis Gaudet and 121. Martine Gauthier. He married 61. Anne Blanchard 1672 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
61. Anne Blanchard, born 1645 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada. She was the daughter of 68. Jean Blanchard and 69. Radegonde Lambert.

Children of Pierre Gaudet and Anne Blanchard are:
30 i. Claude Gaudet, born 1677 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Marguerite Belou 1700 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
ii. Piere Gaudet, born 1675 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Cecile Mignault 1700 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born March 17, 1683 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada.

Notes for Cecile Mignault:

Acadian Church Records
Winston de Ville, translated & compiled 1964 Mobile, AL.
vol 1 1679-1757 a compilation of miscellaneous baptismal, marriage and funeral records from Beaubassin, Riviere St Jean, Mines, missions in New Brunswick, and the parish churches of Ste Famille de Pabok, Baie des Chaleurs, Grande Riviere, and other places in Acadia and the Gaspe Pennisula. The originals or official copies of these documents are deposited in the Public Archives of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario and indexed MG9, B8, volume 1 Beaubassin and Riviere aux Mines 1679-1686 - Father Moireau is the priest recording the entries p5 : Beaubassin, March 17, 1683 Cecile Meignaux, born the same day, daughter of Jean Aubin Meignaux and Anne duGast. Sponsers : Mr de la Roussibere and Demoiselle Marie Joseph Leneuf de la Valliere.

iii. Marie Gaudet, born 1682 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Joseph Mirande 1704 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
iv. Madeleine Gaudet, born 1682 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Michel Caissy 1708 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
v. Jeanne Gaudet, born 1684 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Abraham Arceneau 1700 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vi. Augustin Gaudet, born 1686 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Agnes Chiasson February 22, 1712 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vii. Jean Gaudet, born 1690 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
viii. Jean Baptiste Gaudet, born 1693 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
ix. Abraham Gaudet, born 1679 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Agnes Girouard 1706 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1685 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Bef. 1715 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.


Generation No. 7

64. Jacques Jacob Bourgeois, born January 09, 1621 in Coutran, LaFerte-Gaucher, Champagne, France; died 1701 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada. He was the son of 128. Jacques Bourgeois and 129. Marguerite Doucet. He married 65. Jeanne Trahan 1644 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
65. Jeanne Trahan, born 1629 in St-Germain-de-Bougeuil, Indre-et-Loire, Anjou, France; died Aft. 1714 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada. She was the daughter of 130. Guillaume Trahan and 131. Francoise Courbineau.

Notes for Jacques Jacob Bourgeois:

The first Bourgeois in North America was Jacques Jacob, who came to Acadie in 1632 most likely as an officer in the contingent of soldiers who came to the colony with Isaac de Razilly, who retook Acadie from the English in the name of the King of France in 1632.

Jacques-Jacob Bourgeois arrived from France in Port Royal, Acadia (now Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia) in 1640 with 18 families and the Sieur d'Aulnay. Jacques was a well educated man and had studied medicine in France. He was Sieur d'Aulnay's surgeon on the trip and afterwards in Acadia. But being a man of many talents, he soon began building ships, so essential to a primarily coastal community, and he set up a flourishing maritime trade with merchants in Boston, especially one named John Nelson. Because the French and English were enemies, such trade was illegal, but it flourished none-the-less. Jacques learned to speak English well, and among his many other occupations, he served as an interpreter in Acadian dealings with the English

With de Razilly, he first settled at La Hève, on the southern coast of present day Nova Scotia. In 1636, after the death of Razilly, the new governor, Charles de Menou d'Aulnay abandoned La Hève and re-established the colony at Port Royal to the northwest.

The most recent theory about Jacques Bourgeois' birthplace comes from Rene Perron. His research on the origins of Acadian families in France brought him to a La Ferte-Gaucher where he found in the registers of the parish of Saint Romain the baptismal certificate of Jacob Bourgeois, born on January 9, 1621, the illigitimate son of Marguerite Bourgeois.

Paul-Pierre Bourgeois, in a special report to 'le bourgeois' (Vol 8, Apr 1998), a newsletter of the Association of Bourgeois in America, wrote that he had seen a birth record for Jacques Bourgeois. This viewing came on a visit by him to the traditional birth place of Jacques, La Ferté Gaucher, France during the Summer of 1994.

The record, dated 8 January 1621 is written in Latin and reads as follows: "...Jacobus, filisu defuncti Nicolai Grandjehan, usque ___ Bourgeois relictae ejusdem..."

Although Paul-Pierre Bourgeois did not offer a translation, I believe it can be partially translated as "...Jacobus, son of the deceased Nicolai Grandjehan,..." jkc]

In 1643, Jacques Jacob Bourgeois married Jeanne Trahan, the daughter of Guillaume Trahan and Françoise Corbineau, at Port Royal. Jeanne, who was born at Bourgueil in the French province of Anjou, was only 14 years old at the time of her marriage to Jacques Jacob. This union is the progenitor of the present day Acadian family, Bourgeois.

Jacques became the wealthiest Acadian, in what was generally a community of equals. Jacques and his family of seven girls and three sons and their spouses were the most prominent Acadian family, based not only on income, but for starting new enterprises valuable to the Acadian community, founding a whole new town, Beaubassin, Amherst, NS, and for their civic involvement in the affairs of their new country. Jacques also built a saw mill and the first flour mill in Acadia.

"Vessels came and went between LaRochelle and Acadia, but the only available passenger list is that of the Saint Jehan out of LaRochelle on April 1, 1636. Among its passengers were Pierre Martin, a farmer, with his wife and one child, and Guillaume Trahan, a master toolsmith, and his wife, their two daughters and his journeyman, all from Bourgueil in Anjou. These may have been the first family units in Acadia." .... "In 1645 , d'Aulnay destroyed LaTour's Fort Sainte Marie at the mouth of the St-John river and hanged the entire garrison, except one. He then built a fort at Menagoueche Point on an elevation above the island now known as Navy Island at West St-John, New Brunswick. By 1654, the feud had so weakened the tiny colony that the fort at Port Royal fell easy prey to the surrender demands of English Captain Robert Sedgwick, acting under orders from Oliver Cromwell. The French commandant, Germain Doucet, Sieur de la Verdue, gave his lieutenant and brother-in-law, Jacques Bourgeois, as a hostage until capitulation could be consummated. Among the signers of the captiulation of August 16, 1654 were one Robert Martin and Guillaume Trahan, the latter signing as the representative of Port Royal's population."

Jacques Jacob Bourgeois was a surgeon. He may have learned this profession in a commandery of the Order of Malta near his home in France.

In 1646, the Governor d'Aulnay granted Jacques Jacob and Jeanne Bourgeois an island called Isle aux Cochons situated in the Dauphin River (today called the Annapolis River) just upstream from Port Royal.

In 1654, the English Major Sedgewick attacked Port Royal, despite the fact that he had no orders to do so and that France and England were at peace. The fort was surrendered after many days of a siege, and Jacques Jacob participated in the battle.

Following the battle, Jacques Jacob and Jeanne Bourgeois by this time have a family consisting of two daughters, Jeanne and Marie, and two sons, Charles and Germain.

When Port Royal surrendered on August 16, 1654, Jacques was liutenant of the small Acadian garrison His name tops the 1671 census list where he is described as a surgeon. Judging by the extent of the cultivated acreage of this farm, in two different places, and by the number of cattle he owned, Bourgeois made a living from agriculture as much as from his profession. It is possible this means that he had already begun his settlement at Beaubassin.

The English did not leave a presence at Port Royal and in 1667, the colony is ceded to France, although the French do not take possession until 1670. In the interim, the Acadians governed themselves under a syndic ruled by Guillaume Trahan, the father of Jeanne Bourgeois.

By the census of 1670, Jacques Jacob and Jeanne had added six children, one son, Guillaume, and five daughters, Marguerite, Françoise, Anne, Marie (the younger) and Jeanne (the younger). In this census Jacques is the richest inhabitant at Port Royal. Also, by this time, Charles, their oldest son had married Anne du Gast (Dugas), and they have one daughter, Marie. The oldest daughter of Jacques Jacob and Jeanne was also married by 1670, to Pierre SIRE (CYR), and they had a son, Jehan.

In addition to his profession of surgeon, Jacques Jacob is a farmer and marine merchant. At Beaubassin, Jacques Bourgeois was involved in ship building and he also built a flour and a sawmill. His boats follow the coast of the Baie Française (Bay of Fundy) to trade with the Mic Mac Indians and descend the coast to New England to trade with the English. He traded with the Bostonians, particularly with John Nelson and William Phips; he learned their language, and was the interpreter for the French in their dealings with the English.

In 1671, Jacques Jacob, aided by his three sons and his son in law, Pierre SIRE, and his future son in law, Jean Boudrot, founded the settlement of Beaubassin, near the border separating present day New Brunswick from Nova Scotia. According to Janet Jehn's "Acadian Descendants" Book, the Jacques Bourgeois family resided at Beaubassin, Acadia and later moved to Port-Royal, Acadia. Her book also indicates that Jacques was instrumental in the actual development of the Chignectou Colony in about 1672, which later became known as the "Bourgeois Colony" and then Beaubassin, Acadia. In 1672 he sold part of his holdings at Port-Royal in order to settle, with his sons Charles and Germain, and two of his sons-in-law, in the Chigneto Basin, thus becoming the first promoter of settlement in this region; he built a flour mill and a saw mill there.

Jacques and his son, Guillaume, returned to live at Port Royal after the establishment at Beaubassin, although they kept farms at the new settlement. Jacques' other two sons, Charles and Germain, stay at Beaubassin with their families.

In 1686, Jacques and Jeanne moved definitively back to Beaubassin to live with their son, Germain. On Oct. 15, 1687, Jacques Bourgeois signed a document, along with others, attesting to the works of the ex-governor d'Aulnay in the colony.

At the beginning of Sept. 1696, the English Colonel Benjamin Church from Boston attacked Beaubassin, which has been left undefended by the French. Jacques is enlisted to negotiate with the English contingent from Boston. Jacques obtained a promise from Church that the residents would be left in peace, but Church reneged on his promise and the soldiers from Boston burned most of the homes in the region. The Acadians of Beaubassin were forced to flee to the woods; however, the English respected the Acadians' capabilities as marksmen and refused to chase the Acadians out of the reach of their ship's cannons.

Jacques Jacob died shortly before 1702, as he is not listed in the census of that year. In 1702, the commandant of the fort at Port Royal referred to him in an official report as the late Jacques Bourgeois. Based on the book entitled "Remember Us" (A genealogy of the Moulton Family from Louisiana), "Dr. Bourgeois arrived at Port Royal in about 1642, as the personal surgeon of Governor d'Aulmnay. Jacques became the Lieutenant (second in command) of Port-Royal, on August 16, 1654. He was one of the most prosperous residents of Port-Royal and owned a schooner used to transport settlers to the new Colony." He died there, an octogenarian, in 1701. Jacques' wife Jeanne Trahan lived at least another four years, as her name is there as Jacque's widow in the 1714 Acadian census.

Jacques never knew that all he had worked for would be taken over
by the English or that another people would settle on the lands he and
his sons had worked so hard to clear and build on. Nor did he dream
that his own grandchildren would be killed, or scattered to the four
winds, some dying of starvation and exposure trying to escape to
Quebec, others exiled to far away lands.

The family name was perpetuated by two of his three sons: Charles, born in 1646, who married Anne Dugas in 1668; and Germain, born about 1650, who married his first wife, Marguerite Belliveau, in 1673 and his second wife, Madeleine Dugas, in 1682; the third son, Guillaume, left only a daughter.

At the time of the deportation in 1755, many of Jacques' grandchildren were deported to the American colonies where they suffered greatly. Some eventually made their way back to Canada, and the Bourgeois name is common today in southeastern New Brunswick.

Others made their way to Louisiana during the mid-1760's. At least nine Bourgeois men settled on the east bank of the Mississippi River in St. James Parish. Five of these, Paul, Joseph, Michel, Pierre and Jean-Baptiste, were brothers, the sons of Paul Bourgeois and Marie-Josephe Brun, originally of Beaubassin, Acadia. From this group came a number of successful sugar planters in St. James Parish.

Beginning in the 1790's and continuing into the 1820's, some of the children and grandchildren of the original Bourgeois settlers moved to Bayou LaFourche. Most settled below Thibodaux.

At least three of the sons of the original Louisiana settlers migrated further west, to the Attakapas. Simon (son of Joseph Bourgeois and Marie Giroir) and Joseph (son of Pierre, Sr. and Marie Bergeron) settled on the Bayou Teche north of St. Martinville. Louis (son of Michel Bourgeois and Anne Landry) settled on Bayou Vermillion near Lafayette. Another Bourgeois, Jean-Baptiste and his wife, Marie Borel, settled on the Teche south of St. Martinville. Many ofhis descendants eventually settled further south, near Charenton and Franklin.





More About Jacques Jacob Bourgeois:
Baptism: January 09, 1621, St-Romain, La Feurt
Burial: 1701, Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada
Immigration: 1642

More About Jeanne Trahan:
Burial: Port Royal Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada

Children of Jacques Bourgeois and Jeanne Trahan are:
i. Jeanne Bourgeois (The Elder), born 1645 in Port Royal Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; died April 08, 1730 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
32 ii. Charles Bourgeois, born 1647 in Port Royal, Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; died 1678 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Anne Dugas 1670 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
iii. Germaine Bourgeois, born 1650 in Port Royal Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; married (1) Marguerite Belliveau 1673 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married (2) Magdeleine Dugas 1682 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1664 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died August 07, 1738 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.

More About Magdeleine Dugas:
Burial: August 08, 1738, Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada

53 iv. Marie Bourgeois (The Elder), born 1652 in Port Royal Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; died March 02, 1740 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married (1) Pierre Cyr 1670 in St-Jean, Port Royal, Annapoliis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married (2) Germain Girouard June 09, 1680 in Notra-Dame, Beaubassin, Cumberland, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
v. Guillaume Bourgeois, born 1655 in Port Royal Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; died Aft. 1679; married Marie Aaae De Martignon D'Apprendisteguy 1686 in New Brunswick, Acadia, Canada.
vi. Marguerite Bourgeois, born 1657 in Port Royal Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; died 1693 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Jean Boudrot 1676 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1656 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; died 1678 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada.
vii. Francoise Bourgeois, born 1659 in Port Royal Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; died 1696 in Grand Pre, Kings County, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Claude Dugas 1673 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1652 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
viii. Anne Bourgeois, born 1661 in Port Royal Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; died December 28, 1747 in St. James Parish, Louisiana; married Rene Leblanc 1679 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1657 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died January 03, 1733 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.

More About Anne Bourgeois:
Burial: December 29, 1747, St. James Parish, Lousiana

More About Rene Leblanc:
Burial: January 04, 1733, Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada

ix. Jeanne Bourgeois, born 1666 in Port Royal Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; died June 09, 1716 in Port Royal Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; married Pierre Comeau II Abt. 1687 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
x. Marie (The Younger), born 1644 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Antoine Leblanc 1680 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.

Notes for Antoine Leblanc:
Antoine settled at St. Charles des Mines, Grand Pre, Acadia where he died. His father's estate was located on the Riviere Dauphin, now the Annapolis River, about 22 miles north of Port Royal, which is now Annapolis. Among the children of Antoine LeBlanc and Marie Bourgeois, seven eventually returned to Canada and three, possibly four found their way to Louisiana.


66. Abraham Dugas, born 1616 in LaChaussee, Loudon, Vienne, France; died 1698 in Port Royal, Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada. He married 67. Marguerite Louise Doucet Abt. 1647 in Port Royal, Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada.
67. Marguerite Louise Doucet, born 1634 in La Chausse, Loudon, Vienne, France; died 1686 in Port Royal, Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada. She was the daughter of 134. Germain Doucet and 135. Undefined Bourgeois.

Children of Abraham Dugas and Marguerite Doucet are:
55 i. Marie Dugas, born 1648 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; died July 07, 1737 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Charles Laramee dit Melanson 1663 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
ii. Claude Dugas, born 1652 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Francoise Bourgeois 1673 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1659 in Port Royal Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; died 1696 in Grand Pre, Kings County, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
33 iii. Anne Dugas, born 1654 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died November 04, 1740 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married (1) Charles Bourgeois 1670 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married (2) Jean Aubin Mignault April 26, 1679 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
iv. Martin Dugas, born 1656 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died 1679 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Marguerite Petitpas Abt. 1676 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
v. Marguerite Dugas, born 1657 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Pierre Arsenault 1675 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vi. Abraham Dugas, born 1661 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married (1) Madeleine Landry in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married (2) Jeanne Guilbaut 1685 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vii. Magdeleine Dugas, born 1664 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died August 07, 1738 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Germaine Bourgeois 1682 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1650 in Port Royal Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada.

More About Magdeleine Dugas:
Burial: August 08, 1738, Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada


68. Jean Blanchard, born Abt. 1611 in Martaize, Loudon, Vienne, France; died Bet. 1678 - 1684. He married 69. Radegonde Lambert Abt. 1638 in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
69. Radegonde Lambert, born 1621 in North Shore, Cap-du-Sable, Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Canada; died Abt. 1689 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada. She was the daughter of 138. Jean Antoine Lambert and 139. Mi'kmaq Indian Woman, Marie.

Notes for Radegonde Lambert:
There was once on the right bank of Chebogue River, at a place that used to be called "Indian Point", then "Point Crocker", and on today's maps "Crocker Hill", a heap of rocks which, it was said, could have been the remains of a monument built in memory of some great Indian chief. During the course of the Second World War, the Canadian army used this site as a firing range, and thus this relic of the past disappeared. If Wyman Road, coming from Yarmouth, were to be extended in a straight line, it would end at about that place, which stood above the cliff, before the descent towards the river. These premises are now occupied by H.V. Anthony Greenhouses Limited.

I would be very surprised if this "heap of rocks" would have been a monument built in memory of an Indian chief; if so, it would be the only example that we would have of such a dedication by the Indians in this part of the country. Furthermore, it does not seem that it could have been a tomb of an Indian over which was erected a monument, because, as Marc Lescarbot, who was here in 1606-07, tells us, the Indians living in southwestern Nova Scotia buried their dead "on a secluded island" towards Cape Sable, adding that "those islands which they use as cemeteries are kept secret among them."

Very old authors talk about a "fort" at "Theboc", the Indian name for what is now Chebogue. They call it "Fort Lomeron", giving even to the place the name of "Port Lomeron". David Lomeron, who was from La Rochelle, France, came to Acadia every year from 1614 to 1623, except in 1622, the year he got married. He acted as agent for two of his rich uncles who dealt in the fish and pelt business. He traded first in Port
Royal with Biencourt, one of the pioneers of Acadia. But in 1618, Biencourt moved to "Theboc", to be closer to the rich fishing grounds; also to the most frequented hunting regions. That is when "Theboc" became a trading post. And as a fort of some sort was always erected for protection wherever a trading post was established, the one at "Theboc" took the name of Lomeron, and it is then that the place itself was known for a time as "Port Lomeron."

In 1628, the Kirkes took possession of the fort in the name of the King of England. In 1632 after the Treaty of Saint-Germain-en-Laye, it was restored to Frances in the hands of de Razilly.

Where was it located precisely? It is not said anywhere. Rude and indifferent as it might have been, its remains must have stayed visible for some time and even for a long time. My belief is that the famous "heap of rocks" on top of that cliff, where H.V. Anthony Greenhouses Ltd. is established, was what remained of Fort Lomeron up to half a century ago.

If we are sure that there were white men here in 1618, we can be quite certain also that there were some here even ten years before, and even earlier. It could be that Chebogue was the third foundation in Acadia; St. Croix Island, between New Brunswick and Maine, established in 1604, was the first, although it did not last. The next year Port Royal was founded. In 1606 or 1607, if there was not a permanent settlement at Chebogue at least it must have been frequented by the pioneers. Champlain in his 1607 map puts here a few buildings; he even tells us that on July 21 of the previous year, 1606, a search party landed at two leagues from Cape Forchu, surely at Chebogue.

Chebogue was very important to the Indians, far more than Yarmouth Harbour, which is "almost wholly dry at low tide", says Champlain. That is why when old authors or documents refer to Cape Forchu it applies about always to Chebogue, instead of Yarmouth Harbour. On account of its vast meadows and its proximity to the abundance of fish, sea-birds and wild life, it was a choice camping ground for the Indians. Even though Rev. Silas Rand, in his dictionary of the Micmac language says that the place-name was originally "utkobok", meaning "cold water" or "living water" which origin most authors have adopted, Father Sigogne, on his part, who was well versed in the Micmac language, thinks that it is derived rather form a word which means "large meadow", "grand pre" in French, which is much more appropriate to its natural features and much more in harmony with the word "theuben", the first spelling that we have of the word, dating back to 1631, and to the word "theboc" that the pioneers learned from the Indians themselves.

It could be that the great Micmac Chief Henry Membertou lived here. It is at this place called "Cape Forchu" that we find his oldest son Louis, when, in 1613, he received with open arms Father Masse and feasted him at a banquet in which the main course was a moose. He had become "sagamo" or chief of his tribe after his father died, September 11, 1611. Because Henry Membertou had been baptised he was buried in sacred ground at Port Royal where there is a sign near the Habitation which reads that here "the Aged and Friendly Micmac Chief Membertou was buried.' The reader will recall that we commemorated the 375th anniversary of his death two years and a half ago, especially at Annapolis Royal. Thus the "heap of rocks" on the bank of Chebogue River could not have been erected on the grave of the great Micmac Chief Henry Membertou.

Even though the French had given to the place the name of "Port Lomeron", the original Micmac name was too much anchored in the mind of the Indians to lose its identity. That is why it lasted up to this day but written in different documents as Tebok, Tgepoc, Thebauque, Theboc, Thebok, Thiebee, Tibogue and Tkebock. With the arrival here in 1761 of the first English settlers, the orthography Chebogue was given to the ancient Indian name and it has been like that ever since.

From the museum website: #4 - PORT LOMERON OR CHEBOGUE

More About Radegonde Lambert:
Aka (Facts Pg): Jeanne Joy Lambert

Children of Jean Blanchard and Radegonde Lambert are:
61 i. Anne Blanchard, born 1645 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married (1) Francois Guérin 1658 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married (2) Pierre dit L'Aine Gaudet 1672 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
41 ii. Madeleine Blanchard, born 1643 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Michel Richard dit Sansoucy Abt. 1680 in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
iii. Martin Blanchard, born 1647 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Francoise Leblanc 1671 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1653 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Bef. 1687 in Acadia, Canada.
34 iv. Guillaume Blanchard, born 1650 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died 1716 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; married Hugette Gougeon Abt. 1695 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
v. Bernard Blanchard, born 1653 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vi. Marie Blanchard, born 1656 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Pierre Gaudet 1675 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1654 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.


70. Antoine Gougeon, born 1626 in Martaize, Loudun, Vienne, France; died Bef. 1678 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada. He married 71. Jeanne Chabrat 1655 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
71. Jeanne Chabrat, born 1626 in Mont-sur-Guesne, Poitou, France; died in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada. She was the daughter of 142. Antoine Chabrat and 143. Francoise Chaumeret.

Child of Antoine Gougeon and Jeanne Chabrat is:
35 i. Hugette Gougeon, born 1657 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; died December 18, 1717 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; married Guillaume Blanchard Abt. 1695 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.


72. Robert Cormier, born 1610 in LaRochelle, Charente Maritime, Aunis, France; died 1712 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada. He married 73. Marie Perade.
73. Marie Perade, born Abt. 1619 in LaRochelle, Charente Maritime, Aunis, France.

Notes for Robert Cormier:
On January 8, 1644, Robert Cormier, master ship's carpenter at La Rochelle, his wife Marie Péraud and their son Thomas, signed to sail aboard the ship Le Petit Saint-Pierre, so as to come work at Fort Saint-Pierre, at Cape Breton Island. Eventually, Robert returned to France and his only son, Thomas, stayed in Acadia. Thus began the family history of the Cormier ancestors in America.

The first chapter in the history of the CORMIER family in America begins with an act of seeming irrationality that makes the rest of the story possible. In the spring of 1644, during the first year of the reign of the boy king Louis XIV, a 34-year-old charpentier de navire, his wife, and two sons, one of them still an infant, left their native city of La Rochelle, France, to seek their fortune in the New World. They set sail aboard the Le Petit Saint-Pierre for Fort Saint-Pierre on Cape Breton Island in the colony of Acadia, bound as servants to Louis Tuffet, commander of the fort.

La Rochelle was a prosperous Atlantic port at the time, its troubles in the terrible Wars of Religion long behind it. Trading vessels from all over the world could be found in its magnificent harbor, as could the smaller ships of the fishermen who crossed the Atlantic every spring to fill their nets in the teeming banks off the coast of North America. Certainly there was plenty of work in La Rochelle for a ship?s carpenter or for anyone associated with the maritime trades. So why did this ship?s carpenter leave the city of his birth and venture with his family to a struggling colony across a wide and dangerous ocean, to a colony which in its 40-year existence had seen more hardship and strife than happiness and prosperity?

This ship?s carpenter left no diary or cache of letters to give us an answer to this question. He was illiterate and thus unable to leave us his story even if he had wanted to. The best we can do to understand his motivation and why the CORMIER family came to America is to review the history of the place into which he cast his fortunes, the place we now call Nova Scotia but which he and his fellow Frenchmen called l?Acadie.

The usual place to begin the story of the founding of the European New World is with the commercial revolution that swept through Europe in the centuries that followed the great Crusades to the Holy Land. In 1095 Pope Urban II stood before a council of bishops at Clermont in southern France and preached the First Crusade. The pontiff had learned that a new breed of infidels, the Seljuk Turks, had seized the Holy Land and refused to allow Christian pilgrims to visit the Holy Places. He urged the warriors of Christendom to strap on their swords, take up the cross of their crucified Redeemer, and hurry to the Holy Land to drive these Muslim infidels from Jerusalem. The knights of France and other Christian kingdoms took up the papal challenge, and four years later the Holy City fell to them in an orgy of blood and righteousness.
For two centuries the European knights clung to their principalities in the Holy Land, and for two centuries they tasted the luxuries of the Orient, literally. From far to the east came peppers, clove, cinnamon and nutmeg to please the palates of men who had tasted only salt in their food, as well as silks and jewels and every manner of luxury not easily found in Europe. In the 1200s, as the Christians gradually lost their grip on the Holy Land, Italian merchants opened a lucrative trade with the Muslim infidels to provide these Oriental luxuries for the wealthy consumers of Europe. By the 1300s, the Italian city-states of Genoa and especially Venice dominated with their navies the Mediterranean trade routes that had not seen so much use since Roman times.
To other Europeans, this Italian monopoly of the Oriental trade was unacceptable. The tiny kingdom of Portugal, which faced the vast Atlantic to the west, was the first maritime power to try to circumvent Italian dominance in the Mediterranean by finding an all-water trade route to the East. Encouraged by the king?s brother, Prince Henry, Portuguese navigators in the 1400s made their way cautiously down the west coast of Africa in hopes of finding a way around the great continent and on to the Far East. Another, perhaps more compelling motivation, was the exploitation of Africa itself. What the Portuguese found in West Africa proved to be as lucrative as spices and silk?gold, ivory, jewels, and ? slaves. In order to secure the flanks of their bases along the African coast, the Portuguese seized Madeira, the Azores, and Cape Verde Island, thrusting their economic and strategic interests deep into the Atlantic. Finally, in 1488, the Portuguese navigator Bartolomeu Diaz discovered the tip of Africa. Ten years later Vasco da Gama ventured all the way to India via the tip of Africa and returned with ships filled with Oriental luxuries. The Portuguese now possessed their all-water route to unprecedented wealth and power.
It was an obscure Italian with a Great Idea who shook up the world again. Cristoforo Colombo was born in Genoa in 1451, the son of a weaver who lost his boy to the lure of the sea. Young Columbus, as he is known to history, worked in the merchant fleet of his native city then switched his allegiance to Portugal. Sometime in the 1480s, after carefully (mis)calculating the circumference of the earth, he conceived his Great Idea?to sail due westward from Europe and reach the Indies by crossing the Atlantic Ocean. He was confident that his skills at navigation and command could overcome all obstacles he would
surely encounter in this dangerous voyage and give Portugal a much shorter route to the riches of the East. He presented his idea to his Portuguese masters, but a maritime commission rejected his calculations and refused to entrust a fleet to him. Undaunted, he moved to Spain but met similar rejection there. He refused to give up and eventually sold his idea to Queen Isabella of Castille, who, with her husband, King Ferdinand of Aragon, had just conquered the Moors and thus established a certain degree of domestic tranquility in their kingdoms. Christian Spain was ready, Isabella believed, to compete in the Eastern trade. So Columbus became the admiral of a fleet of three ships which set sail from Palos in early August 1492. Two months later, on the sandy beach of San Salvador, in the present-day Bahamas, the history of the world was profoundly changed when Columbus reached "the Indies." Though Columbus himself never acknowledged the existence of the New World he had accidentally discovered, others did. Spanish conquistadors exploited Columbus?s great discovery, and by the early 1500s, gold and silver from America, as the New World came to be called, transformed Spain into the most powerful kingdom in Europe.

Portugal stumbled upon the New World in 1500 when Pedro Alvares Cabral, on his way to India to duplicate Da Gama?s voyage, was blown off course by mid-Atlantic winds and landed on the coast of present-day Brazil. The papal Treaty of Tordesillas six years before had awarded Portugal that part of the Atlantic east of a certain line of longitude down the middle of the ocean. The place where Cabral landed and promptly claimed for Portugal stood east of the treaty line. So even the Portuguese now had claims to exploit in what Europeans soon realized was an entirely New World.
Meanwhile, another Italian navigator, Giovanni Caboto of Venice, known to history as John Cabot, also had seized upon the idea of a cross-Atlantic voyage to the Indies. He moved to Bristol, England, and coaxed King Henry VII into authorizing a voyage tothe East. Cabot reached "the Indies," probably at Cape Breton Island, in 1496, and explored the coast extensively. Now the English, too, possessed an early claim to North America. But, unlike Spain, which had settled its
domestic difficulties on the eve of Columbus?s first voyage, England was still in turmoil from the recent War of the Roses and was still struggling with its old cross-Channel enemy, France, for possessions on the Continent. England thus failed to exploit its American claims for many decades, leaving Spain and Portugal the early winners in the imperial competition for the New World.

France was a late comer to the competition for America?s riches, and, as in England, domestic turmoil was the stifling factor to its exploitation of the New World. Not until the 1520s did a French monarch, Francois I, authorize a voyage to the New World. Yet another Italian navigator, Giovanni da Verrazano, explored the North American coast in 1524, seeking the elusive Northwest Passage to the Orient. He claimed for France the entire coast of North America, which he called "Arcadia."2 A decade later, in 1534, the Frenchman Jacques Cartier discovered the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the magnificent river that flowed into it. On subsequent voyages into the early 1540s, he explored the river as far up as present-day Montréal and spent a hard, cold winter at the site of Quebec. Cartier?s discoveries and explorations in the St. Lawrence region gave France its first undisputed claim in North America. But, like England and unlike Spain and Portugal, no imminent settlements came of it.
The Protestant revolt that had erupted in Europe a generation after Columbus?s discovery of the New World consumed France as much as it did Germany and England in a maelstrom of rancor and violence. The French theologian Jean Calvin was as important a figure in the struggle against Catholic authority as was the founder of Protestantism, the German priest Martin Luther. Run out of France in the year of Cartier?s first voyage to North America, Calvin took refuge in Geneva, but his ideas seeped back into this native country. French Protestants, known as Huguenots, challenged the authority of the pope and preached what Catholics insisted were heretical doctrines. As a result of these intractable theological differences, a series of nine Wars of Religion raged through France from 1562 to 1598. "At times," a modern historian has written, "they brought the French monarchy very low; the nobility came near to mastering it. Yet, in the end, aristocratic rivalries benefited a crown which could use one faction against another. Meanwhile, the wretched population of France had to bear the brunt of disorder and devastation. In 1589 a member of a unior branch of the royal family, Henry, ruler of the little Spanish kingdom of Navarre, became (after the murder of his predecessor) Henry IV of France and inaugurated the Bourbon line whose descendants still claim the French throne. He had been a Protestant, but now accepted Catholicism as the condition of succession, recognizing the religion most Frenchmen would stand by. The Protestants were given guarantees which left them a state within a state, the possessors of fortified towns where the king?s writ did not run."

One of these Protestant strongholds was La Rochelle, the busy port on the Atlantic coast.
Despite domestic upheaval, the Huguenots, at least, tried to establish French colonies in the New World. In 1555, as war still sputtered between Catholics and Protestants in central Europe, Gaspard de Coligny, Admiral of France, a powerful Huguenot leader, sent an expedition to establish a colony of his fellow Protestants on an island in the harbor of present-day Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Coligny ignored the fact that Portugal had long claimed this area. The next year, Coligny sent 300 reinforcements to the colony, "many picked personally by Jean Calvin himself." The colony languished, and in 1560 the Portuguese attacked the settlement and hanged all of its survivors. Two years later, Coligny tried again, this time in an area claimed by Spain. In 1562 he established the settlement of Fort Caroline in northern Florida and in 1564 Charles Fort, near the Savannah River in present-day Georgia. The devoutly Catholic Spanish would have none of this. In 1565 they attacked Fort Caroline and massacred the entire settlement. They did the same thing to Charles Fort the following year then erected Spanish strongholds at St. Augustine and at St. Catherine?s Island to keep Protestants away from their Catholic realm. In 1572, in the Massacre of St. Bartholomew in France, Catholic militants murdered Coligny along with other prominent Huguenots, "thus bringing to an end the first phase of French transatlantic expansion."4

Not until well into the reign of Henry IV did the French attempt another lodgment in America. It is then that the history of Acadia begins in earnest.

In 1604 the king granted Pierre du Gua, Sieur de Monts, a distinguished member of his court, "extensive rights to settlement, trade, and fishery" in the area the French called Acadie. At that time Acadia meant to the French the area which comprised not only the peninsula of present-day Nova Scotia but also northern Maine, all of New Brunswick, St. Edward?s Island (called Ile St.-Jean by the French), Cape Breton Island (Ile Royale), the Magdalen Islands in the Bay of St. Lawrence, and the southern coast of the Gaspe peninsula in present-day Quebec province.

Like Coligny, De Monts established a settlement in territory claimed by a rival nation. Unlike Coligny, De Monts chose not to remain in France but to go himself to oversee the establishment of his new holdings. He crossed to Acadia in late spring of 1604 with 79 men; no women and certainly no families accompanied this venture. This was to be first and foremost a commercial enterprise bankrolled by an association of merchants, both Catholic and Protestant, back in France. With De Monts were Jean de Biencourt, Sieur de Poutrincourt and Francois Grave du Pont, two of his associates in the venture, and Samuel de Champlain, a noted navigator and geographer and friend of De Monts from their native region south of La Rochelle.6 "A brief survey of the coasts of southwestern Nova Scotia, including the Annapolis Basin, led de Monts to cross the Bay of Fundy [which he called Baie Francoise] and settle on an island at the mouth of the St. Croix River" at the present-day border of Maine and New Brunswick.7
Poutrincourt and Grave du Pont returned to France later that year, leaving De Monts and the others to spend a terrible winter in the new settlement on Dotchet Island. At least 35 of them perished from scurvy. The following June, Grave du Pont returned to the St. Croix with two ships, vital supplies, and reinforcements. De Monts ordered an exploration of the coast south to present-day Cape Cod to find a more suitable place to settle. But he chose to move instead across the Bay of Fundy to the present Annapolis Basin, where, in the summer of 1605, he established Port Royal?the oldest more or less continuously occupied French settlement in the New World and the heart of the French colony of Acadia.8
De Monts erected a small fort with several buildings on the north side of the basin, opposite Goat Island. The following winter, Champlain remained again with the settlers, this time with Grave du Pont. De Monts and Poutrincourt returned to France. De Mont stayed in France and sent Poutrincourt back to Acadia the following July with more supplies and men. To his chagrin, Poutrincourt found Port Royal virtually abandoned when he returned in July of 1606.

Most of the settlers had gone to the other side of peninsula, to Canso, site of a well-known fishermen?s rendezvous, where they were certain to meet ships from the homeland. The fishing trade at Canso and other harbors along the Acadian coast had been flourishing for decades. "First in dozens, then in scores, and finally in hundreds," notes an historian of the period, fishermen from western Europe "came to the coast of Newfoundland and gradually to the offshore banks and the coasts of Greater Acadia in search of codfish" throughout the sixteenth century. "Norman and Breton, West-country English and Basque, Spanish and Portuguese, they gradually added to the technique of packing the cod down in heavy salt on their vessels (the ?green? or ?wet? fishery) the practice of curing their catch on shore, in the open air soon after catching, with much less salt. This (the ?dry? fishery) made a more valuable product and required landing on, and learning the nature of, the rocky Atlantic shoreline. Disembarking only briefly in the summers at first, they began to find the shore phase of their work important enough to require leaving men to winter in the new land in order to protect structures and to prepare for the following season?. We have records of many who virtually lived their lives in such a fishery and whose knowledge of the coasts of today?s Atlantic Canada must often have been profound. Lescarbot described a meeting at Canso, in 1607, with a French fisherman who was on his forty-second annual voyage to the area."9
But Poutrincourt was not in Acadia to establish a fishery settlement. He ordered De Monts?s men back to Port Royal to sow vegetables and grain to feed the new settlement. "A lime kiln was built, a forge set up and charcoal made for it, and paths were cut from the settlement to the fields and the valley. Tradesmen of many kinds spent a brief part of the day at their trades, the rest of it fishing, hunting, and gathering shellfish. They had a good winter, and toward the end of March [1607] started sowing seeds and building a water-powered gristmill to take care of the anticipated harvest."

Then disaster struck. In the summer of 1607 news arrived in Port Royal that the king had withdrawn De Monts?s concessions in Acadia. Court politics threatened, not for the last time, the existence of the colony. The year before, "merchants and shipbuilders from Dieppe and La Rochelle succeeded in having De Monts?s 10 year trade and commerce rights in Acadia annulled just when the entire venture was beginning to look promising."11 De Monts gave up and stayed in France. Port Royal was no longer necessary. That autumn "the longest and most elaborate post-Viking settlement of Europeans on the North American continent north of Florida was abandoned?in the same year that Jamestown was established" by an English company of merchants 800 miles to the south in Virginia.12
Champlain, however, remained in North America and turned his attention westward, to the interior of the continent. The year after Port Royal was abandoned, he founded a new settlement at Quebec on the site of the old Indian town of Stadacona, where Cartier had wintered on the St. Lawrence River 70 years before. Thus began the French colony of Canada, which would be based on the lucrative fur trade, not on the vagaries of agriculture. The little fort at Port Royal lay abandoned for three years, a victim of the elements, until politics in France fashioned a new monopoly for Acadia and resurrection of the settlement in 1610.

This time it was Poutrincourt who would risk his fortunes in Acadia. He brought with him one of his sons, Charles de Biencourt, who returned to France in 1611 with a cargo of furs then hurried back to Port Royal with reinforcements and two unwelcome Jesuit priests. Poutrincourt returned to France in 1612 on the annual voyage back to the homeland. Meanwhile, the ministers of Marie de Medici, widow of the recently-assassinated Henry IV and regent for her 10-year-old son, King Louis XIII, granted a concession in Acadia to the son of Grave du Pont, who established himself on the St. John River in present-day New Brunswick. In 1613, the Marquise de Guercheville, a champion of the Jesuits, founded another Acadian settlement at St.-Sauveur on Mount Desert Island, off the present coast of Maine. Conflicting claims as well as politics in the mother country threatened once again the future of the Acadian venture.13
No sooner had these rival Acadian settlements put down roots than a greater menace came sailing up the coast, flying the flag of England. Samuel Argall, a Welsh freebooter and the dangerous right arm of Jamestown?s new marshal, Sir Thomas Dale, sailed from Virginia in 1613 and destroyed the infant settlement on Mount Desert Island. In November he returned and fell up Port Royal, "looted and burned the? settlement, dispersed its people, and destroyed its livestock."

When Poutrincourt returned from France in 1614, he found only a skeleton of a settlement at Port Royal. A decade of effort had produced little for him and his associates. He had his fill of this Acadian business. He gave up and returned to France. But his son Biencourt and a handful of other settlers, including Claude de Saint-Etienne de La Tour and his son Charles, refused to abandon Acadia. They had seen the rich potential of the trade in furs and were determined to supply the wealthy merchants of La Rochelle with the precious commodity. Poutrincourt soon after was killed in France in a bloody civil war, so Biencourt inherited his father?s title as well as his claims in Acadia.

The next ten years of Acadian history were dominated by the efforts of Biencourt and the La Tours to profit from the fur trade. Without the local Indians, however, their efforts to maintain a French presence in Acadia would not have been possible. At first the French were no more impressed with the local Algonkian-speaking Indians than by any other natives they encountered. The Mi?kmaq, called the Souriquois by the French at first, "were a small group thinly scattered over a large area when the seventeenth century opened. Contacts throughout the previous century, chiefly through fishermen, had prepared them for trading relationships with the French," but they were little acculturated to French habits and attitudes when De Monts and his associates first encountered them. They numbered then about 3,000 over an area of roughly 30,000 square miles. The French put them to good use for their own purposes, and the Mi?kmaq responded in kind. "The chief services of the Micmac to the French, consistent with the maintenance of their own basic culture patterns, were as guides, paddlers, hunters, and procurers of the furs and feathers for which a market existed in Europe, the St. Lawrence settlements, or the English colonies to the south." This largely amicable relationship with the French was sealed by the efforts of Catholic missionaries. "The slow, but ultimately universal, attachment of the Micmac to the Roman Catholic faith reinforced their ties to the French. These ties were maintained assiduously by missionaries largely based on Quebec," who were not above sending their native charges on the warpath against English settlements.

With the death of Biencourt at Port Royal in 1623, only the La Tours remained to carry on trade with the Indians. Charles La Tour claimed that Biencourt had bequeathed to him his rights to the colony. But it almost did not matter anymore. The English reappeared in greater force, and this time they came to stay.

Virginia, too, had endured its share of troubles after its founding in 1607. From the beginning the English exhibited a remarkable ineptness in dealing with the Algonkian-speaking natives who lived in the vicinity of Jamestown. In the first years of the settlement, mostly as a result of incompetent leadership and Indian depredations, the death toll among the settlers was astonishingly high. The introduction of tobacco cultivation as a profitable venture and the conversion of Princess Pocahontas to Christianity after her kidnapping by the resourceful Argall were lucky strokes for the hard-pressed English during the administration of Thomas Dale. By 1619 they even managed to export the institution of representative assembly to Virginia and allowed a cargo of Africans who had arrived on a Dutch ship at Jamestown to become indentured servants. But the peace that followed the princess?s marriage to the Englishman who had introduced tobacco to the colony was shattered in March of 1622 when the Indians under a formidable new leader massacred hundreds of the colonists in every settlement but Jamestown. The king?s ministers soon took over administration of the colony from a defeated Virginia Company. By then, English Separatists had founded a colony of their own near Cape Cod in 1620?only 300 miles from Port Royal, closer to Acadia than to Virginia! These Pilgrims were more adept at relations with the Indians than the Virginia pioneers had been. And now two English colonies offered a potential threat to the tenuous French hold on Acadia.

To make matters worse for the French in North America, in 1621 King James I of England (who also was King James VI of Scotland) rewarded one of his Scottish friends with a generous grant?Acadia and Canada! Sir William Alexander was Count of Sterling and a prominent member of the House of Lords. In 1622 and 1623 he ventured to Acadia, which he called "Nova Scotia," explored along its coast and made landfall in Newfoundland but did not settle his grant ? just yet. Not until 1628 or 1629 did he establish a Scottish settlement at Port Royal. In the latter year his associates, the Kirke brothers of Scotland, forced Champlain to give up the crown jewel of French North America, the settlement at Quebec. A third British settlement was established in the region, on Cape Breton Island in 1629. The story of French Acadia, and French Canada for that matter, could have ended there and then. But the French, despite years of bad luck and neglect, were unwilling to give up their holdings in North America. The Treaty of St.-Germain-en-Laye in 1632 ended hostilities between the two old antagonists. The treaty also provided that the British return Acadia and Canada to the French.

In the meantime, life had become dangerously complicated for the hard-pressed La Tours. Claude, the father, seems to have been captured in the Gulf of St. Lawrence by one of the Kirke brothers. Sir William offered him and his son titles of nobility in exchange for the outposts they controlled in Acadia. This probably meant little to Charles, who seldom remained in one place. "After the death of the ? Sieur de Biencourt," wrote an enemy of Charles about his exploits during this time, "Charles Latour travelled the woods with 18 or 20 men, mingled with the savages and lived an infamous and libertine life, without any practice of religion, not even bothering to baptize the children they procreated and instead abandoned them to their poor, miserable mothers as the coureurs de bois still do today." These half-breed children, called metis by the French, "became some of the staunchest allies of the first French families of Acadia." Many of them were baptized by French missionaries and clung to the faith of their fathers. They diligently pursued the trade in furs that sealed the relationship between the worlds of their fathers and their mothers.

After Canada and Acadia reverted to France, the powerful minister of King Louis XIII, Cardinal Richelieu, organized an expedition to reestablish French presence in North America under his cousin, Isaac de Razilly of Touraine. Razilly was named "Lieutenant-General of all of New France (Canada) and Governor of Acadia." The Company of New France, a powerful trading organization founded by Richelieu in 1627 to organize the revenues in cod fishing and the fur trade in French North America, would direct Razilly?s efforts.

Razilly?s expedition contained three ships full of men and supplies and arrived at La Heve, now La Have, near present-day Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, on the Atlantic coast, in September 1632. Razilly left the settlers at La Heve then hurried to Port Royal to take possession of the old post from the surviving Scots, most of whom returned to Britain. He seized the fort at Penobscot, Maine, by force soon afterwards. After 18 years of neglect and British interference, French suzerainty in Acadia finally had been restored.

Razilly next had to deal with the troublesome Charles La Tour, who considered himself master of all Acadia and had considerable influence with the Indians. Razilly was forced to compromise with his clever compatriot. He would remain with his settlers at La Heve while La Tour and his men could retain their outposts at Cape Sable at the southern end of the peninsula and at Pentagouet and Machias in present-day Maine, from which they could pursue their lucrative fur trade. Razilly also granted La Tour a large concession centered on the St. John River in present-day New Brunswick. La Tour later built Fort Jemseg up the river to secure his rights to the area. Fur-bearing animals now were more plentiful in the western woods of the mainland than on the over-hunted peninsula. Razilly was determined to establish an agriculture-based settlement at La Heve as well as an entrepot for furs and codfish. La Tour was interested only in the fur trade, and Jemseg was a well-placed, well-protected headquarters from which to pursue his efforts.

Razilly brought with him two associates who would play prominent roles in Acadian history. Charles de Menou de Charnissay, Sieur d?Aulnay, Razilly?s chief lieutenant, was 36 when he arrived at La Heve. Nicolas Denys was 34. Razilly granted them concessions also. D?Aulnay took charge of the settlers, who now for the first time included women and families, and directed the agricultural efforts of the colony. Denys, "an accomplished businessman and tireless trader," took charge of the Acadian fisheries, the fur trade, and a new lumber trade. His concessions extended along the Gulf of St. Lawrence from Canso all the way up to the Gaspe Peninsula. He established his headquarters at Chedabucto, now Guysborough, Nova Scotia, near Canso, and opened a fishing port at Port Rossignol, now Liverpool, Nova Scotia, just down the coast from La Heve. In the 1640s he built a post at Miscou, at the entrance of the Baie des Chaleurs in present-day nort

More About Robert Cormier:
Occupation: Bet. 1640 - 1690, Master carpenter and ship builder at Port Royal

Child of Robert Cormier and Marie Perade is:
36 i. Thomas Charles Cormier, born 1636 in LaRochelle, Charente Maritime, Aunis, France; died 1690 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Marie Madeleine Girouard 1688 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.


76. Daniel Leblanc, born 1626 in France; died Bef. 1698 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada. He married 77. Francoise Gaudet Abt. 1650 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
77. Francoise Gaudet, born 1623 in Martaize, Loudon, Vienne, France; died Abt. 1700 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada. She was the daughter of 154. Jean Gaudet and 155. Undefined.

Notes for Daniel Leblanc:
The LeBlanc family history began so long ago, when in about the mid 1600's a young man nineteen years of age left his native land of France to strike out on his own in a new place by the name of Acadie. This young man whose place of origin and whose family lineage in France remains unknown was named Daniel LeBlanc. Some have wanted to believe that Daniel descended from a noble family of Dauphiné, based on research by d'Entremont (J. Alfred LeBlanc - the Origins of the LeBlanc Family, "Footprints of the Exiled: A LeBlanc Family Newsletter", vol I, 1986, p. 7), but the family proposed (to René to Alphonse to Pierre) is a Blanc or deBlanc family, rather than LeBlanc (see MM. de La Chenaye-Desbois & Badier, "Dictionnaire de la noblesse, 3e édition, Paris, 1863, vol. III, p. 314-317).

It is estimated that Daniel may have sailed for Acadia about 1648/1649, marrying widow, Françoise Gaudet Mercier at the age of 24 in about 1650, presumably at Port-Royal, though no documents are available to prove either the exact date nor the exact place this auspicious moment took place. What is known is that D'Aulnay was still alive when they came to Acadia and he died shortly afterwards. However, between the Deportation and the French Revolution, many documents were destroyed that would have told us this story. Françoise was the widow of an unknown Mercier with a daughter Marie (who it has been said was often referred to as Marie LeBlanc). The early census records for Port-Royal also list Francoise' father Jean. The name of her mother has not been found to this day. In addition to her father Jean and Françoise, we also find her siblings Denis and Marie. Stephen White, Genealogist at Moncton University believes that there may have been other Gaudet siblings who have not yet been identified. However, it is known that those three were born in France. In later years, Jean Gaudet would marry Nicole Coleson and they would have a son named Jean. Many errors have been made attributing Nicole as having married Jean at a much earlier time but that isn't so - nor did she have any other children with him except for their son Jean. Jean Gaudet the father was advanced in years when he married Nicole.

Daniel settled on the north bank of the Port-Royal River (today called Annopolis River), to the northeast of the marshlands of Bélisle, about nine miles further up than fortat Port-Royal, and a half mille further down than Saint-Laurent chapel.

Daniel and Françoise had seven children consisting of 6 sons and 1 daughter. It is said that one son may well have become a navigator - this would have been Étienne. He sailed away at a young age and was never heard from again. Meanwhile, the other five sons married and had large families. Consequently, as Daniel and Françoise LeBlanc's grandchildren married, it was not long before the LeBlanc family was the largest in Acadia and it has remained the largest to come out of Acadia. Today, the LeBlanc name is as well recognized in the Maritimes as Smith is in the United States!

Daniel was one of the principle citizens of the area and on 24 May 1690, when Sir William Phipps ordered the inhabitants to select six from among them to form a council that would ensure that peace and justice would prevail, Daniel was one of those selected.

According to a census in 1671, Port Royal, Daniel was listed as a laborer, aged 45 years, 7 children, 1 girl, 6 boys. His wife was 48. Livestock totaled 18 cattle with horns and 26 female sheep. They worked on 10 acres of land that was located in two different places. They were buried in the French cemetery at Port Royal (now Annapolis Royal, NS).

One relevant document dated 5 Oct 1687 concerns a deposition made by Daniel. This concerns work done in Acadia by the Sire of Aulnay before his death in 1650. Among those who signed, there was "the mark of " Daniel, he therefore arrived in Acadia before the death of Aulnay in June 1650.

Daniel Le Blanc and Francoise Gaudet are the ancestors of one of the largest Acadian families in the Maritime provinces. Neither the place of origin nor the parents of Daniel Le Blanc are known.

It is likely that Daniel came to Acadia under contract to governor d' Aulnay. He became one of the most successful farmers in Acadia during the 17th century. He settled along the banks of the Port Royal river where his children were born between 1651 and 1664. Five sons married and gave the couple 35 grandchildren. Daniel died 1695 at the age of 69.

Along with their Acadian compatriots, the Le Blancs would undergo the trials of the Deportation. Most of the victims of the expulsions between 1755 and 1758 were exiled to Anglo-American ports, in France, and in Québec. Others managed to escape their enemies and found refuge in the forests of present day New Brunswick. After a few years of resistance from the forest, these fighters surrendered to the British authorities in 1763, at the end of the Seven Years War.

Once freed from the forts, descendants of Daniel Le Blanc and of Francoise Gaudet settled in different areas of the Maritime Provinces.




Notes for Francoise Gaudet:
After Daniel's death, Francoise is found in the census records living with her son, Pierre. By the 1700 census, Francoise is no longer living.


Children of Daniel Leblanc and Francoise Gaudet are:
38 i. Jacques Leblanc, born Abt. 1651 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. May 1731 in St-Charles-des-Mines, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Catherine Hébert 1673 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
ii. Francoise Leblanc, born 1653 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Bef. 1687 in Acadia, Canada; married Martin Blanchard 1671 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1647 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
iii. Étienne Leblanc, born 1656 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.

More About Étienne Leblanc:
Travel: Set sail at a young age and was never heard from again.

iv. Rene Leblanc, born 1657 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died January 03, 1733 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Anne Bourgeois 1679 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1661 in Port Royal Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; died December 28, 1747 in St. James Parish, Louisiana.

More About Rene Leblanc:
Burial: January 04, 1733, Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada

More About Anne Bourgeois:
Burial: December 29, 1747, St. James Parish, Lousiana

v. André Leblanc, born 1659 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died May 04, 1743 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vi. Antoine Leblanc, born 1662 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died July 20, 1730 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vii. Pierre Leblanc, born 1664 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.


78. Antoine Hébert, born 1622 in Le Haye, Descartes, Touraine, France; died Abt. 1690 in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada. He was the son of 156. Jacques Hébert and 157. Marie Juneau. He married 79. Genevieve Lefrance 1639 in Le Haye, Descartes, Tourraine, France.
79. Genevieve Lefrance, born Abt. 1624 in La Haye, Descartes, Touraine, France; died in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.

Notes for Antoine Hébert:
The two brothers, Antoine and Étienne Hébert, arrived in Acadia from a new recruitment conducted by Charles de Menou of Aulnay, Charisnay. They were sons of Jacques Hébert and Marie Juneau of Le Haye, Descartes on Touraine. They are the ancestors of all Acadian families by that name. They arrived in Acadia in July 1640 under the command of Germain Doucet, Lord of LaVerdure, Captain of Arms of Pentagoet.



More About Antoine Hébert:
Occupation: Cooper (Barrel Maker)

Children of Antoine Hébert and Genevieve Lefrance are:
39 i. Catherine Hébert, born 1656 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1692 in Grand-Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Jacques Leblanc 1673 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
ii. Jean Baptiste Hébert, born 1653 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died November 03, 1710 in St-Charles-des-Mines, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Anne Doucet 1674 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.


84. Antoine Bourg, born Abt. 1609 in Martaize, Loudun, Vienne, France; died Abt. 1686 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada. He married 85. Antoinette Landry Abt. 1636 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
85. Antoinette Landry, born Abt. 1618 in La Ventrouze, Perche, Orne, France; died in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada. She was the daughter of 170. Jean Claude Landry.

Children of Antoine Bourg and Antoinette Landry are:
42 i. Francois Bourg, born 1644 in Richmond, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died 1685 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; married Marguerite Madeleine Boudrot 1665 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
ii. Marie Bourg, born 1645 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; died September 19, 1730 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; married Vincent Breaux November 1661 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
iii. Jean Bourg, born 1647 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; died 1695 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; married Marguerite Martin 1667 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
iv. Bernard Bourg, born 1649 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; died May 24, 1725 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; married Francoise Brun 1670 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
v. Martin Bourg, born 1650 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; married Marie Potet Dupuis 1675 in Cobequid, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vi. Marie Jeanne Bourg, born 1653 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; married Jean Antoine Belliveau 1671 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vii. Renee Bourg, born 1655; died 1685 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Charles Boudrot 1674 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1649 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; died 1727 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada.
viii. Huguette Bourg, born 1657 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Sebastien Brun Abt. 1676 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
ix. Jeanne Bourg, born 1659 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Pierre Commeau 1677 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
x. Abraham Bourg, born 1661 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. April 13, 1736 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Marie Renee Brun 1683 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born Abt. 1655 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died April 13, 1736 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.

Notes for Abraham Bourg:
BOURG, ABRAHAM, deputy representing Upper Cobequid, Nova Scotia, 1720–26; b. at Port-Royal (Annapolis Royal, N.S.) 1662, son of Antoine Bourg and Antoinette Landry; married in 1683 Marie Brun, daughter of Vincent and Marie Breaux; date of death unknown.

Abraham Bourg was one of the deputies chosen by the Nova Scotia Council to represent the Acadian districts in 1720, under the governorship of Richard Philipps. He was apparently released from his duties in 1726 at his own request, because of lameness and infirmity. On 16 Sept. 1727 he, Francis Richards, and the deputies Charles Landry and Guillaume Bourgeois refused to take the oath of allegiance to George II. Lieutenant-Governor Lawrence Armstrong maintained, moreover, that they had assembled the inhabitants a day earlier than they had been ordered. Armstrong charged that instead of persuading them to their duty by solid arguments of which they were not incapable they [the deputies] frightened them . . . by representing the oath so strong and binding that neither they nor their children should ever shake off the yoke.

For their alleged opposition they were committed to prison. It was ordered that Bourg, however, in consideration of his great age, should be allowed to leave the province as soon as possible, but without his goods. As the others were released after a short time, it appears unlikely that Abraham Bourg actually left. An oath of 1730 bears a signature which may be his. It is not known when Bourg died, but it may have been after 13 April 1736, when Marie Brun’s burial record identifies her as the wife (not widow) of Abraham Bourg.




86. Michel Boudrot, born Abt. 1600 in Cougnes, La Rochelle,A unis, France; died August 20, 1688 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada. He married 87. Michelle Aucoin Abt. 1640 in Cougnes, La Rochelle,A unis, France.
87. Michelle Aucoin, born 1621 in Cougnes,La Rochelle,Aunis,France; died December 17, 1706 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada.

Notes for Michel Boudrot:
BIRTH-PARENTS-CENSUS-OCCUPATION-MARRIAGE-CHILDREN-DEATH: Stephen A. White, DICTIONNAIRE GENEALOGIQUE DES FAMILLES ACADIENNES; 1636-1714; Moncton, New Brunswick, Centre d'Etudes Acadiennes, 1999, 2 vols.; p. 184; own copy. #1: [No birthplace or parents are given.] He was a "laboureur" and "civil and criminal lieutenant general" at Port-Royal.

BIRTH-IMMIGRATION-OCCUPATION-CENSUS-MARRIAGE-CHILDREN: Web page of Univ. of Moncton, Centre d'etudes acadiennes, by Stephen White, on the 37 Acadian families hosting the 1994 World Congress; orig. published by La Societe historique acadienne, CAHIERS; vol. 25, no. 2&3 (Apr-Sep 1994), at <http://www.umoncton.ca/etudeacadiennes/centre/white/sha.html...;.

Michel BOUDROT [heading is BOUDREAU], born around 1601, arrived in Acadie before 1639, when he is mentioned as having become Syndic at Port-Royal. Around 1641 he married Michelle AUCOIN; eleven
children.lieutenant general (magistrate) on that He was "laboureur" on the 1671 census, and civil and criminal lieutenant general (magistrate) on that of 1686.

CENSUS: 1671, Port Royal, Acadia, age 71 years.

CENSUS: 1686, age 85 years.

BIRTH-OCCUPATION-MARRIAGE: Bona Arsenault, HISTOIRE ET GENEALOGIE DES ACADIENS; 1600-1800; Ottawa, Editions Lemeac, 1978, vols. 2-6; p. 441 (Port Royal).
Michel was Councilor and Lieutenant-General of Acadia at Port Royal, and judge of that place. He was undoubtedly originally from Cougnes, diocese of La Rochelle and married Michelle AUCOIN before their departure from France. He arrived in Acadia around 1642. (A footnote cites Genevieve Massignon, LES PARLERS FRANCOIS; pp. 43 & 57.)

OCCUPATION: He was judge at Port Royal, councilor and lieutenant-general at the siege of Acadia, replaced by Mathieu DES GOUTINS on 31 Mar 1687 (Memoires de La Societe Genealogique Canadienne-Francaise, vol. 4, no. 3).

BIRTH-MARRIAGE: LE RE'VEIL ACADIEN/THE ACADIAN AWAKENING; ; vol. XIII, no. 2 (May 1997); p. 32; Michel BOUDROT, parents unknown, married in France (possibly LaRochelle) around 1638 to Michelle AUCOIN.

MARRIAGE: "perhaps at the church of Notre-Dame-de-Cognes" in Cognes [present-day La Rochelle] in France.

IMMIGRATION: Was definitely in Acadia by Sep 1639, when he consecrated Marie, the daughter of Carles de Menou in Port Royal as one of the first syndics of Port Royal.

CENSUS: 1671 Acadian Census, Port Royal; 1671; Microfilm from Canada, National Archives
(MG1, vol. 466, pt.1); consists of 13 number-stamped pages; roll in the Santa Cruz Genealogical Society Library. On p. 7: "laboureur" (plowman) Michel BOUDROT, age 71, with his wife Michelle AUCOIN, age 53, and eleven children (three of them married). The non-married are Charles, 22; Marie, 18; Jehan, 16; Habrahan, 14; Michel, 12; Olivier, 10, Claude, 8; and Francois, age 5. They have 20 head of cattle, 12 sheep, on eight arpents of workable land.

CENSUS: 1678, Port Royal, Acadia; 1678; Clarence D'Entremont, "Rencensement de Port Royal, 1678 avec commentaires," in MEMOIRES DE LA SOCIETE GENEALOGIQUE CANADIENNE-FRANAISE, vol. XXII, No. 4 (Oct-Nov-Dec 1971), pp. 226-247, translated and corrected in "Genealogy and Archives: Census of Port Royal, 1678" in FRENCH CANADIAN AND ACADIAN GENEALOGICAL REVIEW, vol. VII, No. 1 (Spring 1979), p. 52. Michel BOUDROT & Michelle AUCOIN, on 12 arpents with 10 cattle and 3 guns. Living in household are 5 boys, ages 22 to 12.

CENSUS: 1686, Port Royal, Acadia [p. 2]. He was chief judge and lieutenant-general of the King for the colony (listed second in this Recensement, on the first real page--"Lieut't. g'nal de la jurisdiction du Port Royal"). Michel's age 85, his wife Michelle AUCOIN , 65. Their unmarried sons Michel, 26, and Francois, 20, still at home with the parents. Land 20 arpents cultivated, with 16 cattle and 17 sheep, [6 hogs?], 3 guns. The first name on the 1686 census was "Le sr. Alexandre le BORGNE, Seigneur du lieu." His age
was 43, his wife Marie de St. Estienne, age 32, with 4 children and a domestic Estienne AUCHER, age 72 [sic for 13, who is he?].

OCCUPATION-DEATH: Retired from his duties on 20 Aug 1688 due to age; absent from 1693 census, where his widow is age 78, living with son Francois' family.

More About Michelle Aucoin:
Burial: December 18, 1706, Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada

Children of Michel Boudrot and Michelle Aucoin are:
i. Francoise Boudrot, born 1642 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; married Étienne Robicheaux 1664 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.

Notes for Francoise Boudrot:
She was enumerated with Estienne Rebichau in the 1678 census living on 1 acre with 19 cattle, four boys ages 12, 9, 4, and 1 (born in 1666, 1669, 1674, and 1677) and two girls ages 15 and 6, born in 1663 and 1672.

Source: 'In Search of our Acadian Roots CD'

ii. Jeanne Boudrot, born 1645 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; died Abt. 1710 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; married Bonaventure Terriot Abt. 1666 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
43 iii. Marguerite Madeleine Boudrot, born 1648 in St-Jean Baptiste, Port Royal, Acadia, Canada; died November 07, 1718 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; married (1) Jean Babineaux; married (2) Francois Bourg 1665 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
iv. Charles Boudrot, born 1649 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; died 1727 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; married Renee Bourg 1674 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1655; died 1685 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
v. Marie Boudrot, born 1653 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; married Michel Poirier 1670 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vi. Jean Boudrot, born 1656 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; died 1678 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; married Marguerite Bourgeois 1676 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1657 in Port Royal Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada; died 1693 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
vii. Michel Boudrot, born Abt. 1658 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; died 1708 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Madeleine Cormier 1690 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1669 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1705 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
viii. Abraham Boudrot, born 1660 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; died 1698 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; married Cecile Melanson 1684 in Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1670 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; died Aft. 1720 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Acadia, Nova Scotia, Canada.
ix. Olivier Boudrot, born 1661 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; died 1686 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; married Elizabeth Isabelle Petitpas 1685 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
x. Claude Boudrot, born 1663 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; died March 07, 1739 in St-Charles-aux-Nines, Grand Pre, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Anne Marie Thibodeaux 1685 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
xi. Francois Boudrot, born 1665 in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; died September 28, 1733 in Grand Pre, Kings County, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Marie Madeline Belliveau 1692 in Grand Pre, Kings County, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.


108. Pierre Laverdure, born 1600 in France; died in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts. He married 109. Priscilla Mellanson 1630 in Yorkshire, England.
109. Priscilla Mellanson, born 1613 in Yorkshire, England; died 1690 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.

Notes for Pierre Laverdure:
The first Melanson was named "LaVerdure" from France. His wifes maiden name was Mellanson. Their sons took her name, it is said, when they went to Nova Scotia because at that time, Nova Scotia was English. The ancestral line starts with Charles Mellanson dit LaRamee & Pierre Mellanson dit Laverdure, both born in York , England. Came to Acadia (Nova Scotia) in 1656, on the ship "Satisfaction". Not content with our occupation of Nova Scotia, the English "asked" all "Non-English" to move out. The Melanson family then scattered deeper into Canada, took a boat/wagon ride to South Louisiana, or drifted south into New England after the exile.

For the record; the name Melanson first appears in Acadian records (or any where in the civilized world for that matter) as Mellanson, used by Charles "La Ramee" and his elder brother Pierre "LaVerdure". Their children dropped the double "l" but the majority spelled the name as "Melanson" with a few variations (most were illiterate). The name changes, as Eugene began to point out, when the Acadian Melansons were expelled from Acadia. Those exiled to France, Québec, and Louisianna frenchinized their name to Melancon as they were now living in French dominated settlments. This was more than likely due to those taking the records, who likely were French, than by the Melansons themselves. Those that were exiled to English dominated areas (such as England, New England, etc.) retained the original spelling of Melanson. Charles "La Ramee's" kin, for example, ended up in Québec where the French record takers recorded their surname as Melancon, however, later generations that wound up back in New Brunswick (now English controlled) were recorded as Melanson. Of the actual signatures (Charles
"La Ramee's" and his brother Pierre's included) that I have, 99% of them, the early generations that is, spelled their name as Melanson, the exception being the two brothers who used Mellanson.

A Brief History of This Acadian Family
The Melansons in Acadia:

Many a writer has tried to explain the origins of this family. It was generally believed that the Melanson were of Scottish origin but this assumption was based on a historic mistake. There is no document that demonstrates that the Melansons who came to Acadia were of Scottish decent, in fact to the contrary there is proof that they were of English decent.

The two Melanson brothers, PIERRE, dit Laverdure, a stonemason, born in 1632, the spouse of Marie Marguerite Muis d'Entremont, the daughter of the Lord of Pomcoup, Philippe Mius d 'Entremont, and CHARLES, born in 1643, the husband of Marie Dugas, daughter of Armourer Abraham Dugas and Marguerite Doucet of Port Royal, arrived in Port Royal accompanied their parents aboard the ship the Satisfaction, with Sir Thomas Temple, the new English Governor of Acadia, which arrived in 1657. During almost a century, just until the deportation of the Acadians in 1755, the settlement was the place of residence of Charles Melanson and his wife Marie Dugas, and their descendents and associates.

"The Melanson Settlement" is one of the principle Canadian archeological sites illustrating the way of rural life in Acadia in the17th and 18th centuries. It is a mirror of the various aspects "of the daily life, their homes, material culture and their prosperity.

1755: DEPORTATION: In the Autumn of 1755, 1660 Acadians of the region of Port Royal embarked on the ships towards exile. Charles and Ambroise Melanson took refuge in Québec, while Jean Melanson and his family were refugies in France with a group of Acadians Cape Sable. Others were deported to Maryland and other States. The Melanson like hundreds of other Acadians were imprisoned in the military fortresses which were neither more or less than concentration camps. At gun point, English soldiers forced them to work for them. The Melansons were imprisoned at Forts Cumberland and Edward.

Today, this large Acadian family the name of MELANSON-MELANCON-MALANSON-MALONSON can be found in all of Canada, the United States and in France. These Acadians all descendents of PIERRE and CHARLES MELANSON arrived in Acadia during 3 ½ centuries. The majority of Charles' descendents returned to the former Acadia, resettling in Nova Scotia and Southern New Brunswick, and in the USA in the States of Maine and Massachusetts, most continuing to spell their name Melanson, but some have changed to Malanson and Malonson. The majority of Pierre's descendents however did not return, resettling in Louisiana, Québec, and Northern New Brunswick, in the Bathurst region. It is this branch of the family that today predominately spells their name MELANCON. The only descendent of Pierre known to have returned to Nova Scotia was Charles Marie who settled in Pomquet after returning with his mother from exile in France.

Notes for Priscilla Mellanson:
The name Mallinson, Melanson, Melancon etc. was originally spelled Malisone and came from Aberdeen
Scotland. It dates back to 1427 according to the book "The Surnames of Scotland". The name was changed over the centuries to become Malison, then Mallison, then Mallinson. When Priscilla came to Canada the name evolved yet again to Melanson etc. This name is however of Scottish origin and the family members can wear the Dundee tartan as this was the district where the name first originated

Children of Pierre Laverdure and Priscilla Mellanson are:
i. Pierre La Verdure dit Mellanson, born 1632 in Yorkshire, England; died 1700 in Grand Pre, Kings, County, Nova Scotia; married Marie Marguerite anne Mius D'Entremont 1665 in Port Royal, Annapoli, Nova Scotia.

Notes for Pierre La Verdure dit Mellanson:
The village of Grand Pre was founded around 1680, when Pierre Melanson dit La Verdure, his wife and their five children settled on these lands. They were fleeing the capital, Port Royal, which was constantly being disrupted by dangerous conflicts. Toward 1750, Grand-Pré became the largest of the Acadian villages located near the Bay of Fundy and along the Nova Scotian shore, surpassing even Port Royal.

From the Census taker of Port Royal in 1670:

Tailleur - PIERRE MELANSON a refuse de donner son aage et Le nombre de ses bestiaux et terres et sa femme ma respondu si jestois fous de courir les Rues pour des choses de mesme.

(My translation: Tailor, Pierre Melanson refused to give me his age and the number of his livestocks and land, and his wife told me I was crazy to walk the streets for such things)


54 ii. Charles Laramee dit Melanson, born 1643 in Yorkshire, England; died 1700 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Marie Dugas 1663 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
iii. Jean Mellanson dit Laverdure, born 1651 in Yorkshire, England; died Aft. 1676; married Sarah Undefined 1680 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.

Notes for Jean Mellanson dit Laverdure:
Disappeared in late 1676 after being charged with Indian slave trading in Boston. Fate unknown


120. Denis Gaudet, born 1625 in Martaize, Loudon, Vienne, France; died October 11, 1709 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada. He was the son of 154. Jean Gaudet and 155. Undefined. He married 121. Martine Gauthier 1644 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
121. Martine Gauthier, born 1628 in Vienne, France.

Children of Denis Gaudet and Martine Gauthier are:
60 i. Pierre dit L'Aine Gaudet, born 1650 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Anne Blanchard 1672 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
ii. Anne Gaudet, born 1646 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Pierre Vincent 1662 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
iii. Marie Gaudet, born 1651 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Oliver Daigle 1666 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
iv. Pierre Gaudet, born 1654 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Marie Blanchard 1675 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1656 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
v. Marie Anne Gaudet, born 1657; married Martin Aucoin 1672 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.


Generation No. 8

128. Jacques Bourgeois, born Abt. 1585 in Coutran, LaFerte-Gaucher, Champagne, France; died in Coutran, LaFerte-Gaucher, Champagne, France. He married 129. Marguerite Doucet in Coutran, LaFerte-Gaucher, Champagne, France.
129. Marguerite Doucet, born in Champagne, France; died in Coutran, LaFerte-Gaucher, Champagne, France.

Child of Jacques Bourgeois and Marguerite Doucet is:
64 i. Jacques Jacob Bourgeois, born January 09, 1621 in Coutran, LaFerte-Gaucher, Champagne, France; died 1701 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Jeanne Trahan 1644 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.


130. Guillaume Trahan, born 1610 in St-Germain De Bourgeuil, Indre et Loire, Anjou, France; died 1685 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada. He was the son of 260. Nicolas Trahan and 261. Marie Renee Desloges. He married 131. Francoise Courbineau July 13, 1627 in St-Étienne Chinon, Indre-et-Loire, Anjou, France.
131. Francoise Courbineau, born Abt. 1615 in St-Étienne-de-Chinon, Indre-et-Loire,Aanjou, France; died Bef. 1665 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.

Notes for Guillaume Trahan:
Guillaume and Francoise lived at Verron then Bourgeuil before immigrating to Acadia on 1 Apr 1636. They came on the "St. Jehan". He was a blacksmith or toolsmith and an important citizen of Port Royal. He signed the act of capitulation of Port Royal in 1654 on behalf of the citizens.

Guillaume Trahan, son of Nicolas Trahan and Renee Desloges, was born at Bourgueil towards 1606. The 17th of July 1624, in the St-Étienne Church in Chinon, he married Francoise Corbineau. Chinon is situated 15 kilometers to the south-east of Bourgueil and 50 kilometers to the south-west of Tours. In 1636, he emigrated to Acadia. On the passenger list for the ship Saint-Jean, among the " countrymen from Anjou " who are going to " work at New France ", we read this note: Guillaume, "mareschal de tranchant", with his wife two children, and man-servant, also from Bourgeuil." A "marechal de tranchant" is someone who makes all sorts of cutting tools, knifes, scissors, etc. and even table accessories like forks and spoons.

In the area around Chinon, rests the Chateau de Razilly. Two members of this family were actively engaged in the colonization of Acadia: The Commander Isaac de Razilly, Knight of the Religious Order Malte and Leuitenant-General of the King in Acadia, and his brother Claude de Razilly-Launay, silent-partner and business manager of Isaac.

The 14th of January 1634, the Company of New France gave a fief to to Claude, the Sieugneries of La Heve and Port-Royal. Claude de Razilly recruited colonists for Acadia. He chose people mainly from Anjou and Touraine which were close to his family's castle. At Chinon, he recruited craftsman, at Bourgeuil he enlisted six complete families, consisting of 23 people, among whom was Guilaume Trahan, and five other agriculturists who came without their families.

For the month of February 1636, the recruits from Chinon and Bourgeuil went to Tours, where they met up with another group recruited in Champagne by Nicoalas Le Creux, Sieur of Breuil, Commander of the Fort Canseau, on the far eastern side of Acadia. The 1st of April 1636, the Saint-Jean found the Cape of America. At the end of May, the ship dropped anchor in front of the Fort Ste-Marie-de-Graces at La Heve. We learn of the death of Isaac de Razilly during the course of the next winter. Charles de Menou d'Aulnay succeded him as head of Acadia. Finding the site at La Heve being poorly chosen, he decided to take advantage of the arrival of the St-Jean to transport the colony to Port Royal but not on the old site towards the north of the Lake of Port-Royal, but a dozen kilometers more to the east, on the southern river coming from the lake, at the mouth of the Dauphin River (Annapolis River).

"Vessels came and went between LaRochelle and Acadia, but the only available passenger list is that of the Saint Jehan out of LaRochelle on April 1, 1636. Among its passengers were Pierre Martin, a farmer, with his wife and one child, and Guillaume Trahan, a master toolsmith, and his wife, their two daughters and his journeyman, all from Bourgueil in Anjou. These may have been the first family units in Acadia." .... "In 1645 , d'Aulnay destroyed LaTour's Fort Sainte Marie at the mouth of the St-John river and hanged the entire garrison, except one. He then built a fort at Menagoueche Point on an elevation above the island now known as Navy Island at West St-John, New Brunswick. By 1654, the feud had so weakened the tiny colony that the fort at Port Royal fell easy prey to the surrender demands of English Captain Robert Sedgwick, acting under orders from Oliver Cromwell. The French commandant, Germain Doucet, Sieur de la Verdue, gave his lieutenant and brother-in-law, Jacques Bourgeois, as a hostage until capitulation could be consummated. Among the signers of the captiulation of August 16, 1654 were one Robert Martin and Guillaume Trahan, the latter signing as the representative of Port Royal's population."

At Port-Royal, Governor d'Aulnay created a lot of work: erection of dams, building of forts and homes and mills, construction of ships and row-boats, etc. In the center of all of these activities was Guillaume Trahan, maker of cutting tools, who must have been very busy making and repairing the tools needed for all of this construction.

He is certainly one of Governor d'Aulnays trusted men, since on the 21 September 1639, his ten year old daughter Jeanne, is the God-mother of Marie, the oldest girl of the Governor: " Extract of the baptism 21 September 1639 Port Royal,... confirms that Marie daughter of Sieur Charles de Menou, esquire, Lieutenant General for the King on the Island of Acadia, Country of New France was baptized a four o'clock in the afternoon on said day and that she was born by him at one o'clock on Wednesday 21 September and that she was dedicated to the Virgin Mary by Claude Petipas and Monsieur Boudrot, first officials of Port Royal, her god-father being Pierre, son of Pierre Cachet, and her god-mother being Jeanne Trahan, daughter of Guillaume Traihan, toolmaker, and Francoise Corbineau."

The 14th of July 1640, after a large dispute between Charles de Menou d'Aulnay and Charles de Saint-Étienne de la Tour, Governor of a part of Acadie, Guilaume Trahan, Germain Doucet and Isaac Pesseley " representatives of the inhabitants at Pentagouet, La Heve and Port-Royal, are put in charge of an inquest on the doings of La Tour. The report from the enquest is sent to Paris the 29 January 1641.

In 1645, the quarrel between d'Aulnay and La Tour turned into an open war, the Governor of Port-Royal having ordered all of his men to pick-up their guns and go to the streets leading to the Fort St-Jean, head-office of the Government of his rival La Tour. Guillaume Trahan who is of age is forced to take part in the expedition primarily for his skills with cutting tools, which would be needed.

The 10 May 1650, Governor d'Aulnay is killed in a boating accident when his canoe capsized while going down the Moulin River. In 1654, Guillaume Trahan is a representative of the people at Port-Royal, Charles de St-Étienne de La Tour is still Governor of all of Acadia and was married to Jeanne de Mottin, widow of the former Governer d'Aulnay.

Unfortunately, though it being a time of peace, " without any orders from his superiors, Major Robert Sedgewick appeared at the base of Port-Royal, at the head of an army of 500 men, carried on three warships. He arrived at Fort St-Jean and took possession of it after three days, and took Charles St-Étienne as prisoner.

Germain Doucet had nothing but 120 men to fight against the 500 men from Sedgewick. He sent 15 men under the orders of the Sergeant of the Garrison to lie in wait for an ambush against the English. The Sergeant was killed and the others took refuge in the Fort. On the 16th of August 1654, after sixteen days of resistance, Germain Doucet had to surrender to an enemy who was larger in number and in armament. These were the terms of the surrender: "Between Mr. La Verdure, commander of Port-Royal and surrogate guardian of the young children of the late Mr. D'Aulnay, and Mr. Robert Sedgewick, English Commander, Esquire.

The Sieur came out of the Fort with his garrison with their weapons and beating drums, flag deployed, "balle en bouche", musket or gun on shoulders, wick burning on both ends, and their baggage. They will be granted safe passage to France with their provisions for two months. As for the children (of D'Aulnay) we will take possession of all the furniture, property, merchandise and animals that belong to them. The
inhabitants will have their freedom of conscience, and can live in their own homes and property with all the furniture that belongs to them. Their staying by means of recognition of their Seigneurial duty for which they are obliged to pay by their grants; with the freedom to sell said furniture and property as seemeth good to English persons or the French who are staying in the Country.. and to ensure the the above articles are followed, The Sieur La Verdure has left as hostage Mr. Jacques Bourgeois, his brother-in-law and Lieutenant of the area, and the Sieur Emmanuel Le Borgne, son, until the terms of the treaty have been fulfilled.

We have signed, Robert Bourgeois, Robert Sedgewick, Robert Salem, Marke Harrison,
Robert Martin, Richard Morse, plus the Reverend Father Leonard de Chartres and Mr.
Guillaume Trouen (Trahan), representative of the people and the Sieur Borgne
(father)."

After the departure of of the French Garrison, the English ship left Port-Royal and brought with it Governor La Tour as prisoner. Sedgewick left no english army at Port-Royal. Some Bostonien merchants set-up shop there and had trading posts, all under surveillance to instruct the English Governor, who had residence at Pentagouet. The Acadians governed themselves, with a council precided over by the agent, Guillaume Trahan.

Francoise Courbineau died towards 1660. It would appear she had no other children than those who were brought with her from France in 1636. In 1665, Guillaume Trahan, around age 57, married a young lady, Magdeleine Brun, 20 years old, daughter of Vincent Brun and Vincente Breau and was born at Port-Royal the 25th of January 1645.

In 1670, the Knight Grandfontaine took possesion of Acadia, which had been returned to France under the Treaty of Breda. His first item of business was to take a Census of the people of Acadia, which would be headed by Father Laurent Moulins.

" Tool Maker - Guillaume Trahan aged 60 years, his wife Magdeleine Brun aged 25. Their children 3. Guillaume 4, Jean-Charles 3, Alexandre 1. Their horned animals 8 and ten sheep. Their workable land five acres." For this census Guillaume had 3 Grand-sons, 7 grand-daughters, and one great-granddaughter and one great-grandson.

Guillaume Trahan died around 1680. In 1686 Magdeleine Brun was recorded two times. The first time she was married to Pierre Jean dit La Riviere and she had with her from her first marriage three boys and three girls. The second time she was a widow from La Riviere and had a daughter from her second marriage.


Child of Guillaume Trahan and Francoise Courbineau is:
65 i. Jeanne Trahan, born 1629 in St-Germain-de-Bougeuil, Indre-et-Loire, Anjou, France; died Aft. 1714 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Jacques Jacob Bourgeois 1644 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.


134. Germain Doucet, born Abt. 1610 in LaChaussee, Loudon, Vienne, France. He married 135. Undefined Bourgeois Abt. 1632.
135. Undefined Bourgeois

Child of Germain Doucet and Undefined Bourgeois is:
67 i. Marguerite Louise Doucet, born 1634 in La Chausse, Loudon, Vienne, France; died 1686 in Port Royal, Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; married Abraham Dugas Abt. 1647 in Port Royal, Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada.


138. Jean Antoine Lambert, born Abt. 1598 in Martaize, Loudon, Vienne, France; died 1671 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada. He married 139. Mi'kmaq Indian Woman, Marie Abt. 1620 in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
139. Mi'kmaq Indian Woman, Marie, born Abt. 1605 in Fort Lomer,Cap-du-Sable, Port Royal, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.

Child of Jean Lambert and Mi'kmaq Woman is:
69 i. Radegonde Lambert, born 1621 in North Shore, Cap-du-Sable, Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Canada; died Abt. 1689 in Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, Cumberland, Acadia, Canada; married Jean Blanchard Abt. 1638 in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.


142. Antoine Chabrat, born in Poitou, France; died in France. He married 143. Francoise Chaumeret Abt. 1623 in Poitou, France.
143. Francoise Chaumeret, died in France.

More About Antoine Chabrat:
Burial: Poitou, France

Children of Antoine Chabrat and Francoise Chaumeret are:
71 i. Jeanne Chabrat, born 1626 in Mont-sur-Guesne, Poitou, France; died in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; married (1) Jehan Poirier 1626 in Poitou, France; married (2) Antoine Gougeon 1655 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
ii. Mathurine Chabrat, born 1628 in Mont-sur-Guesne, Poitou, France.


154. Jean Gaudet, born 1585 in Martaize, Loudon, Vienne, France; died 1672 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada. He married 155. Undefined.
155. Undefined, born in France; died in Martaize, Loudon, Vienne, France.

Notes for Jean Gaudet:
JEAN GAUDET is said to have arrived in Acadia with his son, Denis, and settled in Port Royal ca. 1640. The pair probably came from governor de Menou d'Aulnay's seigniory near Loudun, France. Other reports indicate he was in Acadia with his entire family much earlier (1610, 1614, 1632). However, it is more likely that Jean arrived with his family ca. 1640, as very few families were present in the early days of the young colony. According to the 1671 census for Port Royal, Jean is listed as 86 years old, which would place the date of his birth at 1585.
Whether Jean arrived in 1610 or 1640, his first wife appears to have died before 1640, for in 1641 Jean married Nicole Coleson. By the census of 1686, Nicole was listed as a widow.

Children of Jean Gaudet and Undefined are:
77 i. Francoise Gaudet, born 1623 in Martaize, Loudon, Vienne, France; died Abt. 1700 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Daniel Leblanc Abt. 1650 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
120 ii. Denis Gaudet, born 1625 in Martaize, Loudon, Vienne, France; died October 11, 1709 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Martine Gauthier 1644 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.
iii. Marie Anne Gaudet, born 1633 in Martaize, Loudon, Vienne, France; died July 30, 1710 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Étienne Hébert Abt. 1650 in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1625 in La Haye, Descartes, Touraine, France; died Aft. 1670 in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.


156. Jacques Hébert, born 1600 in Le Haye, Descartes, Tourraine, France; died in Le Haye, Descartes, Tourraine, France. He married 157. Marie Juneau Abt. 1620 in Martaize, Loudon, Vienne, France.
157. Marie Juneau, born Abt. 1603 in Martaize, Loudon, Vienne, France; died in Le Haye, Descartes, Tourraine, France.

Children of Jacques Hébert and Marie Juneau are:
78 i. Antoine Hébert, born 1622 in Le Haye, Descartes, Touraine, France; died Abt. 1690 in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Genevieve Lefrance 1639 in Le Haye, Descartes, Tourraine, France.
ii. Étienne Hébert, born 1625 in La Haye, Descartes, Touraine, France; died Aft. 1670 in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married Marie Anne Gaudet Abt. 1650 in Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; born 1633 in Martaize, Loudon, Vienne, France; died July 30, 1710 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.


170. Jean Claude Landry, born 1590 in La Ventrouze, Perche, Orne, France.

Child of Jean Claude Landry is:
85 i. Antoinette Landry, born Abt. 1618 in La Ventrouze, Perche, Orne, France; died in Port Royal, Annapolis Nova Scotia, Acadia Canada; married Antoine Bourg Abt. 1636 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.


Generation No. 9

260. Nicolas Trahan, born Abt. 1570 in Montreuil, Maine et Loire, Anjou, France; died Abt. 1632 in Montreuil, Maine et Loire, Anjou, France. He married 261. Marie Renee Desloges March 1589 in Montreuil-Bellay, Bourgeuil, Anjou, France.
261. Marie Renee Desloges, born Abt. 1570 in Montreuil-Bellay, Bourgeuil, Anjou, France; died April 11, 1632 in Montreuil-Bellay, Bourgeuil, Anjou, France.

Child of Nicolas Trahan and Marie Desloges is:
130 i. Guillaume Trahan, born 1610 in St-Germain De Bourgeuil, Indre et Loire, Anjou, France; died 1685 in Port Royal Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada; married (1) Francoise Courbineau July 13, 1627 in St-Étienne Chinon, Indre-et-Loire, Anjou, France; married (2) Marie Madeleine Brun Abt. 1665 in Port Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Acadia, Canada.



Endnotes

1. St-Antoine-de Verchéres, Québec, Canada, Parish Records, 1805, 119, Baptism Teodule bourgeois.
2. Vermont State Vital Records.
3. Vermont State Vital Records, Middlesex, Vermont, Groom Marriage Certificate.
4. Virginia Easley DeMarce, Notebook: French Canadian Settlement in Grand Isle County of Vermont, Second Line 2.16, Perotte Family.
5. Vermont State Vital Records, Middlesex, Vermont, Death Certificate: 62 yrs. 5 mos. 2 days, Bushway 1870-1909.
6. Vermont State Vital Records, Middlesex, Vermont, Death Certificate: 62 yrs. 5 mos. 2 days.
7. St-Antoine-de-Verchéres, Québec, Canada, Parish Records. 1805, Baptism Teodule Bourgeois.
8. St-Antoine-de-Verchéres, Québec, Canada, Parish Records. 1805, 119, Baptism Teodule Bourgeois.
9. Virginia Easley DeMarce, Notebook: French Canadian Settlement in Grand Isle County of Vermont, Second line 2.16.
10. second line 2.16, Perrotte Family.
11. Virginia Easley DeMarce, Notebook: French Canadian Settlement in Grand Isle County of Vermont, second line 2.8.1.6, Perrotte Family.

Re: Bushway/Parot

Dot Drake (View posts)
Posted: 20 Mar 2005 3:12PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: PARROTT, MARTELL, O'NEIL
Hi Penny,
I'm a direct descendant of Joseph and Emelie Parot of South Hero, VT, through their youngest son Charles who married Margaret O'Neil and lived in Colchester and Milton, VT. I've been working on the family for many years and have traced them back to our soldier ancestor and his origins in France. Would love to share with you if you will email me.
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